Category: New Bern

November 7th, 2018 by newbernpostadmin

The U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) is encouraging those affected by Hurricane Florence from Sept. 8 through Oct. 8, 2018 in North Carolina to submit their completed applications, even if they have not settled with their insurance company.

“Waiting to file an SBA application could cause unnecessary delays in receiving disaster assistance, and survivors may miss the application deadline. Returning the loan application is an essential part of the disaster recovery process,” said Kem Fleming, director of SBA Field Operations Center East.

If a survivor does not know how much of their loss will be covered by insurance or other sources, SBA will consider making a loan for the total loss up to its loan limits, provided the borrower agrees to use insurance proceeds to reduce or repay their SBA loan.

Physical disaster loans are available to businesses of all sizes, non-profit organizations, homeowners and renters to repair or replace disaster-damaged property, including contents and automobiles. Economic Injury Disaster Loans are available for small businesses, small agricultural cooperatives, small businesses engaged in aquaculture and most private non-profit organizations of all sizes having difficulties meeting operating expenses because of the disaster.

Interest rates are as low as 3.675 percent for businesses, 2.5 percent for non-profit organizations and 2 percent for homeowners and renters with terms up to 30 years. Loan amounts and terms are set by the SBA and are based on each applicant’s financial condition.

Applicants may be eligible for a loan amount increase up to 20 percent of their physical damages, as verified by the SBA for mitigation purposes. Eligible mitigation improvements may include a safe room or storm shelter, sump pump, French drain or retaining wall to help protect property and occupants from future damage caused by a similar disaster.

To be considered for all forms of disaster assistance, applicants should register online at DisasterAssistance.gov or download the FEMA mobile app. If online or mobile access is unavailable, applicants should call the FEMA toll-free helpline at 800-621-3362. Those who use 711-Relay or Video Relay Services should call 800-621-3362.

Applicants may apply online using the Electronic Loan Application (ELA) via the SBA’s secure website at DisasterLoan.sba.gov.

Additional details on the locations of Disaster Recovery Centers and the loan application process can be obtained by calling the SBA Customer Service Center at 800-659-2955 (800-877-8339 for the deaf and hard-of-hearing) or by sending an email to disastercustomerservice@sba.gov. Completed applications should be returned to a center or mailed to: U.S. Small Business Administration, Processing and Disbursement Center, 14925 Kingsport Road, Fort Worth, TX 76155. For more information about SBA recovery assistance, visit www.sba.gov.

The SBA has extended the deadline to apply for physical disaster damages in North Carolina. Businesses and individuals with physical damages caused by Hurricane Florence on Sept. 7 – 29, 2018, should apply for SBA low-interest disaster loans before the Dec. 13, 2018 deadline.

Posted in FEMA, Hurricane, New Bern, SBA

November 7th, 2018 by newbernpostadmin

The U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) has extended the deadline to apply for physical disaster damages in North Carolina. Businesses and individuals with physical damages caused by Hurricane Florence on Sept. 7 – 29, 2018, should apply for SBA low-interest disaster loans before the Dec. 13,

The disaster declaration covers the North Carolina counties of Anson, Beaufort, Bladen, Brunswick, Carteret, Chatham, Columbus, Craven, Cumberland, Duplin, Durham, Greene, Guilford, Harnett, Hoke, Hyde, Johnston, Jones, Lee, Lenoir, Moore, New Hanover, Onslow, Orange, Pamlico, Pender, Pitt, Richmond, Robeson, Sampson, Scotland, Union, Wayne and Wilson; for economic injury only in the contiguous North Carolina counties of Alamance, Cabarrus, Caswell, Dare, Davidson, Edgecombe, Forsyth, Franklin, Granville, Martin, Mecklenburg, Montgomery, Nash, Person, Randolph, Rockingham, Stanly, Stokes, Tyrrell, Wake and Washington; and the contiguous South Carolina counties of Chesterfield, Dillon, Horry, Lancaster and Marlboro.

SBA disaster loans are available to businesses of all sizes, most private nonprofit organizations, homeowners and renters to cover uninsured losses from the disaster. Interest rates are as low as 3.675 percent for businesses, 2.5 percent for private nonprofit organizations, and 2.0 percent for homeowners and renters. Loan terms can be up to 30 years.

Economic injury disaster loans are also available to provide disaster related working capital to small businesses and most private nonprofit organizations. These working capital loans may be used to pay fixed debts, payroll, accounts payable, and other bills that could have been paid had the disaster not occurred.

Applicants may apply online using the Electronic Loan Application (ELA) via the SBA’s secure website at DisasterLoan.sba.gov.

To be considered for all forms of disaster assistance, applicants should register online at DisasterAssistance.gov or download the FEMA mobile app. If online or mobile access is unavailable, applicants should call the FEMA toll-free helpline at 800-621-3362. Those who use 711-Relay or Video Relay Services should call 800-621-3362.

Additional details on the locations of Disaster Recovery Centers and the loan application process can be obtained by calling the SBA Customer Service Center at 800-659-2955 (800-877-8339 for the deaf and hard-of-hearing) or by sending an e-mail to disastercustomerservice@sba.gov.

The filing deadline to return applications for physical property damage is Dec. 13, 2018. The deadline to return economic injury applications is June 14, 2019.

The U.S. Small Business Administration makes the American dream of business ownership a reality. As the only go-to resource and voice for small businesses backed by the strength of the federal government, the SBA empowers entrepreneurs and small business owners with the resources and support they need to start, grow or expand their businesses, or recover from a declared disaster. It delivers services through an extensive network of SBA field offices and partnerships with public and private organizations. To learn more, visit www.sba.gov.

Posted in Craven County, Economy and Employment, FEMA, Housing, Hurricane, New Bern, SBA

November 7th, 2018 by newbernpostadmin

Survivors of Hurricane Florence who apply for disaster assistance from FEMA may be contacted by the U.S. Small Business Administration with information on how to apply for a disaster loan.

SBA offers low-interest disaster loans to businesses of all sizes, private nonprofit organizations, homeowners and renters. Next to insurance, SBA low-interest disaster loans are the primary source of funds for real estate property repairs and replacing contents destroyed during Hurricane Florence.

Homeowners may borrow up to $200,000 from SBA to repair or replace their primary residence. Homeowners and renters may borrow up to $40,000 to repair or replace personal property. Businesses may borrow up to $2 million for any combination of property damage or economic injury.

There’s no obligation to accept a disaster loan, but survivors may miss out on the largest source of federal disaster recovery funds if they don’t submit an application.

These disaster loans cover losses not fully compensated by insurance or other resources. Survivors should not wait for an insurance settlement before submitting an SBA loan application. They may discover they were underinsured for the labor and materials required to repair or replace their home. An SBA low-interest disaster loan can cover the gap.

If survivors have not settled with their insurance agency, SBA can make them a loan for the full amount of their losses. They can then use their insurance proceeds to reduce or pay off the SBA loan.

By law, both FEMA and SBA cannot duplicate benefits of other agencies or organizations.

If applicants don’t qualify for a loan, SBA will refer them back to FEMA and they could be considered for other FEMA grants under Other Needs Assistance.

Examples of Other Needs Assistance that do not depend on completing the SBA application include:

  • Disaster-related medical and dental expenses.
  • Disaster-related funeral and burial expenses.
  • Increased cost of child-care expenses.
  • Miscellaneous items, such as smoke detectors and weather radios.
  • Other serious disaster-related needs not covered by insurance or other sources.

Some types of ONA that do require an SBA loan application include:

  • Personal property replacement.
  • Moving and storage fees.
  • Financial help with disaster-caused vehicle repair or replacement expenses.

In planning their recovery, survivors should give themselves the widest possible set of options. Submitting the application makes it possible to be considered for additional grants, and if they qualify for a loan they will have that resource available if they choose to use it.

Information about low-interest SBA disaster loans, application forms, and where to get help with an application are available online at SBA.gov/disaster. Survivors may also call 800-659- 2955 or 800-877-8339 (TTY) or email DisasterCustomerService@sba.gov. Applicants may Apply Online for Disaster Loan Assistance, or at any disaster recovery center.

The centers serve as one-stop shops for survivors who need one-on-one help. Survivors can visit any center for assistance. To find center locations and current hours, download the FEMA mobile app in English, the FEMA mobile app in Spanish, the ReadyNC app, or visit FEMA.gov/DRC. SBA has staff at all centers to provide one-on-one assistance to homeowners, renters and businesses of all sizes.

You can watch an online video in American Sign Language that explains the Reasons to Apply for an SBA Loan.

For more information on North Carolina’s recovery from Hurricane Florence, visit ncdps.gov/Florence and FEMA.gov/Disaster/4393. Follow us on Twitter: @NCEmergency and @FEMARegion4.

Posted in FEMA, Hurricane, New Bern, SBA

November 7th, 2018 by newbernpostadmin

Craven Community College (Craven CC) has been recognized as one of the best colleges offering online learning in North Carolina by the Community for Accredited Online Schools.

As a leading resource for campus and online learning, the site released its annual ranking for the 2018-19 school year, honoring Craven Community College for its excellence in online learning.

Craven CC was ranked No. 4 on the list 44 two-year colleges in North Carolina offering online programs.

“We wanted to highlight schools like Craven Community College who are providing exceptional online education experiences for their students,” said Doug Jones, CEO and Founder of the Community for Accredited Online Schools. “These schools continue to uphold rigorous accreditation standards and show an overall commitment to maximizing student success.”

To qualify, schools must be regionally or nationally accredited, hold a not-for-profit status in the United States and offer at least one online degree. Schools were then ranked based on their quality, affordability, flexibility and degrees granted to their students.

Go here For more information on Craven CC’s online learning ranking and further details on the methodology used to rank each school.

Founded in 1965, Craven Community College is part of the North Carolina Community College System. With campuses in New Bern and Havelock-Cherry Point, Craven CC serves about 3,200 curriculum students and more than 10,000 continuing education students each year. The college offers a wide range of associate degree and certificate programs, as well as college transfer courses, career and occupational offerings, partnerships with four-year universities, specialized workforce training options, developmental studies and basic skills classes. The Lifetime Learning Center and Adult Enrichment Program offer lifelong learning opportunities. Craven Early College High School programs are available on both campuses. Craven CC is also home to Public Radio East, one of the few community colleges nationally with this distinction. For more information about the college, visit www.cravencc.

The Community for Accredited Online Schools (AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org) was founded in 2011 to provide students and parents with quality data and information about pursuing an education that has been certified by an accrediting agency. Its community resource materials and tools have been featured by over 1,000 schools and universities and span topics such as college accreditation, financial aid, and online learning resources. Its annual school rankings feature higher education institutions that offer excellence in online learning programs.

Posted in Craven Community College, Education, New Bern

November 7th, 2018 by newbernpostadmin

The City of New Bern will resume certain utility fees that were suspended during hurricane Florence.

Due to the storm’s widespread impact across our area, the Board of Aldermen unanimously agreed in September to temporarily suspend late fees, delinquencies and shutoffs for nonpayment.  The Board also agreed to waive new deposits for current customers until mid-November.  These actions effectively extended the due date of unpaid bills until such time that the City could recover from the hurricane.

All past due amounts must be brought current by close of business on Friday, Dec. 7.  If customers are unable to get caught up or current, they are encouraged to visit the Utility Business Office (UBO) at 606 Fort Totten Drive and speak to a customer service representative about a special storm payment arrangement.

The UBO is open Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.  No appointment is necessary.  However, appointments are encouraged to reduce customer wait time.

These special storm payment arrangements will not count toward the four payment arrangements allowed each fiscal year under the City’s current business practices, but customers must remain current once the arrangement is made.

If the special storm payment arrangement is broken, the past due account balance must be paid in full.  Attached is a document reflecting our business practices in regards to deposits and payment arrangements.

Late fees, delinquent fees and shutoffs for nonpayment will resume after Dec. 7.  Deposit requirements will resume after Nov. 15.  Deposits caused by late and delinquent actions will resume after Dec. 7.

The reinstatement of fees comes more than 80 days after hurricane Florence ravaged New Bern and eastern North Carolina.

“The Board of Aldermen and management staff have carefully considered this resumption of fees after the storm,” said Mark Stephens, City Manager. “We remain sympathetic to the hardships faced by our residents and are implementing special storm payment arrangements to ease the burden on our customers.  We appreciate the community’s understanding during this recovery process.”

Utility staff are prepared to answer questions and assist customers with payment arrangements. As a reminder, customers have several options for paying City of New Bern utility bills: online at www.newbernnc.gov, at the Utility Business Office, and at Walmart stores in this area.

Posted in Board of Aldermen, Community issues, Hurricane, Infrastructure, New Bern, Utilities

October 31st, 2018 by newbernpostadmin

Scott Mason gives Historical Society’s Lore Lecture on Nov. 11.

 

WRAL’s Scott Mason has been travelling throughout North Carolina since 1997 meeting interesting characters, learning fascinating stories and discovering delicious food.  

On Sunday, Nov. 11 at 2 p.m. at the New Bern Historical Society’s annual Lore Lecture, he’ll share some of what he’s learned presenting Tarheel Traveler, Stories from the Road.  This is a free presentation. No tickets or reservations are necessary.  Doors will open at 1pm.  There will be a reception following the lecture.

Mason is a broadcast journalist with 35 years of television experience. He has won dozens of awards for documentaries, writing, and feature reporting, including three National Edward R. Murrow awards and 20 regional Emmys. The Electronic News Association of the Carolinas has twice named Scott North Carolina Television Reporter of the Year.

Mason has worked as a reporter and bureau chief for network affiliates in Chattanooga, Tenn.; Winston-Salem; and Dayton, Ohio.

In 1991, Mason joined the PBS affiliate in Richmond, Va., where he created, wrote, produced, and hosted a weekly news magazine. Virginia Currents won more than 100 awards for journalistic excellence during Scott’s tenure. The United States Information Agency distributed the program to embassies worldwide.

His success caught the attention of WRAL-TV, the NBC affiliate in Raleigh. In April 1997, he became the station’s Documentary Producer. He researched, wrote, and produced ten documentaries before adding his talents to the nightly news team as a reporter specializing in features.

Today, Mason is known as the Tar Heel Traveler. His Monday-Thursday series on WRAL takes viewers along the back roads of North Carolina where he meets memorable characters, finds out-of-the-way places and unearths fascinating historical footnotes. The series has become so popular it has led to Tar Heel Traveler half-hour specials, which he produces each quarter.

Mason has also published two books about his television adventures: Tar Heel Traveler: Journeys Across North Carolina (2010) and Tar Heel Traveler Eats: Food Journeys Across North Carolina (2014), both published by Rowman & Littlefield Press.

Mason‘s third book is FAITH and AIR: The Miracle List (2017, Light Messages Publishing), a creative nonfiction account of people he has profiled during his career who say they have experienced miracles.

The Dr. Richard K. Lore Lecture is presented annually by the New Bern Historical Society as a free event for all those interested in area history.  It is in memory of, and is named for the Society’s long-time historian.

This lecture is presented by the New Bern Historical Society in partnership with Tryon Palace and is made possible by funding from the North Carolina Humanities Council, a statewide nonprofit and affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

The mission of the New Bern Historical Society is to celebrate and promote New Bern and its heritage through events and education.  Offices are located in the historic AttmoreOliver House at 511 Broad St. in New Bern.  For more information, call 252-638-8558 or go www.NewBernHistorical.org or www.facebook.com/NewBernHistoricalSociety.

Posted in History, New Bern

October 30th, 2018 by newbernpostadmin

Homeowners who have been impacted by Hurricane Florence have a valid “Natural Disaster” hardship.

Due to this hardship, there may be viable relief options available to homeowners from their mortgage companies, but homeowners may have no idea what is available and how to accomplish securing mortgage relief.

A two hour presentation for homeowners with a mortgage loan will cover the following:

First Hour ​​(55 Minutes)

  • Introduction
  • What Constitutes Disaster? C. Who Is Covered?
  • What Can Be Done?

Second Hour ​​ (55 Minutes)

What Documents Are Needed?

Where to Send Financial Packages?

What Is The Process?

How Long Should It Take?

What If Things Go Wrong?

Closing

Attendees will receive additional resources via email. Both the morning and afternoon sessions are the exact same information.

The same event twice is offered twice:

Saturday, Nov. 3, Garber Methodist Church, 4201 Country Club Road, Trent Woods.

Morning Session 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Check-in and seating beginning at 8:30 a.m.

Afternoon Session 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. – Check-in and seating beginning at 12:30 p.m.

Seating is Limited – Register via Eventbrite or call 252-474-8288

Homeowners with a mortgage who have damaged homes and/or are displaced from their homes may be eligible for mortgage relief.

● This will not help renters.

● This will not help homeowners who own their home outright.

● The focus is on primary & secondary residences. This will not be a session for owners of

investment properties who need mortgage relief on investment properties.

Homeowners who have had a loss and/or interruption in employment because of the hurricane may be eligible for mortgage relief.

● Employer experienced damage during the hurricane and may be closed for repairs and/or closed permanently.

● Agricultural loss of crop, harvest and/or livestock from the hurricane.

● Self employed and/or work from home and unable to work because of home damage.

Who do you know that needs mortgage relief?

● Up to one year with no mortgage payments

● No late fees

● No delinquencies reported to the credit bureaus

● The ability to negotiate how to catch up on payments without making a balloon payment.

Types of available assistance:

Moratorium​​: legal authorization to delay payment of money due or to suspend an activity.

This workout option is typically used for disaster.

Repayment​​: the most common relief is a repayment plan. This is a written agreement that allows the homeowner to bring the loan current within a given period of time by making scheduled payments toward the delinquent amount in addition to regular monthly payments.

Forbearance​​: the mortgage servicer, insurer and investor agree to delay foreclosure or other legal action in return for the homeowner’s promise to pay the debt by a specific date.

Modification​​: written agreement permanently changing one or more of the original terms of the mortgage note: type, rate, term or capitalize delinquency.

Julia Iden, Guest Speaker

Julia Iden is the founding partner of Advance Mortgage Education Incorporated.

She started working in the mortgage industry in 1987. Her career has mainly revolved around defaulted mortgages and helping limit the losses caused by default. She held positions as a claims auditor, loss mitigation negotiator, and corporate default manager for GE Mortgage Insurance Company. Prior to starting Advance Mortgage Education, Iden worked as the loss mitigation consultant for Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation, one of the largest mortgage investors in the country. She spent three years on-site in Washington Mutual’s loss mitigation department managing the Freddie Mac delinquent portfolio.

Posted in Housing, Hurricane, New Bern

October 26th, 2018 by newbernpostadmin

A dental office out of Durham brought smiles this week to the residents of a Red Cross shelter operating in New Bern.

Christi Bintliff and Kim Dodson of Croasdaile Dental Arts delivered 6,000 comfort and cleaning items, along with 800 pounds of dog food, on Friday to the West New Bern Recreation Center for distribution to storm victims in Eastern North Carolina.

The American Red Cross is still sheltering more than 60 displaced Craven County residents at the rec Center more than a month after Hurricane Florence made landfall and caused significant flooding in the region.

Bintliff, the dental practice administrator, said they knew that the community would still have needs after the initial outpouring of support that comes in the wake of any large-scale disaster and that they were blessed to be able to assist in meeting them.

The truckload delivered Friday was filled with donations the dental practice collected from its clients and then matched. Bahama Road Veterinary Clinic from Bahama, just outside of Durham, pitched in with the dog food.

Red Cross Volunteer Lallita Andrews, the shelter manager, accepted the delivery. She noted that not only would the shelter clients benefit from the items but that members of the community who stop by for assistance would also be helped by the donation.

New Bern Mayor Dana Outlaw was also on hand to help offload the donations and thank the team for the delivery on behalf of the community.

Posted in Hurricane, New Bern

October 25th, 2018 by newbernpostadmin

Michelle Lee, Principal of Roger Bell New Tech Academy, has been selected as the 2018-19 Principal of the Year for Craven County Schools.

In her role as Principal of the Year, she will serve as the local adviser to the Board of Education and will represent Craven County Schools in local, regional and state events.

Lee’s selection qualifies her to compete with other local award recipients for the Southeast Regional Principal of the Year title. From the regional winners, one will be named the 2019 NC Wells Fargo Principal of the Year.

Lee was one of the two finalists that interviewed with a local selection committee on Oct. 24.

During her interview, Lee stated that she has been lucky to be able to create the environment that exists at Roger Bell this year.

“This has been the greatest gift to be able to build basically a new school from the ground up. I’m not going to say that it wasn’t hard, because it was.”

Lee said parents had to learn to trust her and know that she was there for the long haul.

“I had some parents to push back on me, but I let them know that I wanted to make good decisions for their family.”

Changes made to the school by Principal Lee include hiring Instructional Coaches to assist teachers and creating a space where lessons are modeled and practiced by teachers while receiving real-time feedback.

“I’m completely invested in the school, parents and the children there, and they know that I care about their children. During the hurricane, I had parents to call me and ask for help.  They now look at the school as a resource and we want to be able to provide them with resources and services outside of the traditional scope.  We have to deal with basic needs before we can start working on higher order thinking skills.”

Lee said that her goals were to hire strong teachers for every classroom, be highly-visible in the building and to create an environment where teachers can get their work done at the school, and then go home and have family time.

“These things allow teachers to re-energize and it builds community.  We’re all in this together and I wouldn’t ask them to do anything that I wasn’t willing to do.  I’m willing to get into the weeds with them and get the job done.”

The Wells Fargo Principal of the Year Award was introduced in 1984 to recognize outstanding leadership in North Carolina’s schools and the role of the principal in establishing an environment conducive to the pursuit and achievement of academic excellence. Wells Fargo sponsors the award in conjunction with the N.C. Department of Public Instruction.

Each district winner will receive monetary awards from Wells Fargo in recognition of their achievement and will continue in the regional selection process.  The culmination of the Principal of the Year Program is a ceremony in Raleigh where the statewide winner is announced.

The announcement is set to coincide with the N.C. State Board of Education meeting. The N.C. State Superintendent and other State Board members will also attend this event.

Posted in Craven County, Craven County Schools, New Bern Tagged with:

October 25th, 2018 by newbernpostadmin

The City of New Bern will resume downtown parking enforcement on Monday, Oct. 29.  Enforcement operations were suspended during the hurricane due to the widespread devastation of infrastructure and the impacts to city residents, families, businesses and nonprofit organizations.

For a refresher on downtown parking regulations, visitor parking lots, construction & emergency repair parking permits, and how to apply for a leased parking space, visit our Parking & Transportation page. On-street parking is enforced Monday through Friday from 8 a.m.-4 p.m.

The North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services is waiving fees for the replacement of vital records that were lost of damaged during hurricane Florence.  Go to https://vitalrecords.nc.gov/orderreplacement.htm for more information.

Posted in Hurricane, New Bern

October 25th, 2018 by newbernpostadmin

The City of New Bern has announced a final pass for hurricane Florence debris pickup.

All vegetative and construction demolition debris must be placed curbside before Monday, Nov. 5.  Contractor crews will start on that day and spend several days completing this final pass.

During a work session Tuesday, the Board of Aldermen discussed phasing out debris collection and supported this final pickup.

Residents are encouraged to collect all remaining storm debris and place it curbside, but not in the street, for pickup.  As a reminder, debris must be separated into three piles:  vegetative, construction demolition, and household appliances/electronics.  Push your piles as close to the curb as possible, away from power lines, so that our equipment can pick it up.

No new construction materials – wood, plywood, PVC, insulation, new appliance packaging – will be accepted.  Homeowners whose properties are undergoing new construction should have their contractor dispose of those materials at the landfill located at 7400 Old U.S. Highway 70 West.

Once final pickup is complete on a city street, that street will be inspected and certified by the contractor and the City.  ‘L

“As part of the closeout process, we will mark that street as complete, so the contractor knows – and we want to know – that they have hit every street in the city on their final pass,” said City Manager Mark Stephens.  If you feel your street has been missed during the final pass, please contact the Department of Public Works at 252-639-7501.

When the final pass is complete, Public Works will resume its regular weekly vegetative collection schedule.  Note that all debris placed curbside after the final pass must adhere to the City’s size and length restrictions: no greater than 5 inches in diameter and no longer than 5 feet in length.

Click here to visit the Public Works Leaf & Limb Information page on our website to review collection guidelines and find out when your scheduled pickup day is.

So far, contractor and mutual aid crews have collected 137,353 cubic yards of vegetative debris and 7,033 tons of construction debris within city limits.  Special thanks to our contractor Phillips & Jordan, city crews, and the cities and towns of Raleigh, Charlotte, Rocky Mount, Greenville, Hendersonville, Garner, Harrisburg, Wilson, and Salisbury for their assistance with debris collection.

Posted in Hurricane, New Bern

October 22nd, 2018 by newbernpostadmin

Partners In Education and Craven County Schools, Craven Smart Start and Newspapers In Education, are providing an opportunity for our community to donate books for Craven County Schools’ media centers and classrooms. The Book Drive will take place Nov. 5-9.

The drop-off locations are:  Craven County Schools Central Services/Partners In Education at 3600 Trent Road, Craven Smart Start at 2111-F Neuse Blvd., AlphaGraphics at 3731 Trent Road, Century 21 Zaytoun-Raines at 312 S. Front St., and the Sun Journal at 3200 Wellons Blvd.

Brandy Popp, PIE Fund Raising Committee Chair, said, “The most successful way to improve the reading achievement of our children is to increase their access to print. Communities ranking high in achievement tests have several factors in common: an abundance of books in public libraries, easy access to books in the community at large, and a large number of classroom books per student. Commit yourself to increasing student reading achievement and literacy in Craven County by giving to our Book Drive.”

Popp said, “Last year, through the generosity of our community, Partners In Education was able to donate thousands of books to our classrooms and media centers and to Craven Smart Start. Based on this success, Partners In Education is recruiting the help of all our community partners so that we are able reach more students this year.  Please think of books for all of our school children, PreK-13.”

The donated books will be made available to Craven Smart Start and Craven County Schools teachers for their classrooms at a Book Giveaway.

Partners In Education is an education foundation that provides grant funding and special programs to classrooms and schools within the Craven County Schools system.

For more information about this event, or how you can support PIE, contact Darlene Brown, at 514-6321, or at Darlene.Brown@Cravenk12.org. Visit the PIE website at www.CravenPartners.com to learn more about this program and others offered by Partners In Education.

Since 1988, PIE has been changing the lives of students and families in our community by providing our educators with financial resources that enhance and reward innovative approaches to educational excellence.

Posted in Craven County Schools, Education, New Bern

October 16th, 2018 by newbernpostadmin

WHAT: Information session, “Working with the Division of Employment during a Disaster.” Presented by Lockhart Taylor, the Assistant Secretary for Employment Security for the North Carolina Department of Commerce.

WHERE: Bosch Advanced Manufacturing Center (Bosch AMC) Room 102, Craven Community College (Craven CC), 800 College Court, New Bern NC, 28562

WHEN: Monday, Oct. 22, 2018, 6-8 p.m.

WHO: Small business employers, small business owners, self-employed

WHY: Offered by the Small Business Center at Craven CC, the purpose of this information session by the NC Division of Employment is to help business owners and self-employed in understanding Disaster Unemployment Assistance (DUA). The session will welcome questions about DUA as well as Unemployment Insurance.

HOW: Online registration is requested by visiting www.cravencc.edu/sbc.

This event is free and open to the public. For more information call 252-638-1166 or email sbc@cravencc.edu.

Posted in Business, Craven Community College, Economy and Employment, Hurricane, New Bern

October 12th, 2018 by newbernpostadmin

The following schools are currently on normal hours for students, Friday Oct.12.

◦ Ben D. Quinn Elementary

◦ Bridgeton Elementary School

◦ Craven Early College

◦ Creekside Elementary School

◦ Early College EAST

◦ Grover C. Fields Middle School

◦ New Bern High School

◦ Oaks Road Academy

◦ West Craven High School

◦ Vanceboro Farm Life Elementary

If you are interested in reviewing the Air Quality Reports for the Cleared schools from the External Industrial Hygienist Click HERE. An Information Session for Parents will be held on Friday, Oct. 12 at 9 a.m. at the Board of Education.

Craven County parents, whose families have been displaced due to Hurricane Florence can visit the HERE and provide information so that the school district can reach out to help.

Posted in Craven County, Craven County Schools, Hurricane, New Bern

October 11th, 2018 by newbernpostadmin

Valley Fine Foods, a Forest City, N.C. establishment, is recalling approximately 35,516 pounds of heat-treated, not fully cooked meat and poultry products that may be adulterated due to presence of spoilage organisms that have rendered it unwholesome and unfit for human food, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.

The heat-treated, not fully cooked, refrigerated meat and poultry products were produced on various dates from Aug. 15, 2018 through Oct. 4, 2018. The following products are subject to recall:

• 12-oz. tray packages containing “SIMPLE DISHES™ Chicken Penne Alfredo” with case code #19034, case UPC code 1-07-42753-34709-0, and “BEST IF USED BY” “10/09/18” through “11/25/18”. Unit UPC 7-42753-34709-3.

• 12-oz.  tray packages containing “SIMPLE DISHES™ Chicken Primavera” with case code #19033, case UPC code 1-07-42753-34708-3, and “BEST IF USED BY” “10/09/18” through “11/25/18”. Unit UPC 7-42753-34708-6.

• 12-oz. tray packages containing “SIMPLE DISHES™ Italian Sausage Ziti” with case code #19035, case UPC code 1-07-42753-34711-3, and “BEST IF USED BY” “10/09/18” through “11/25/18”. Unit UPC 7-42753-34711-6.

• 12-oz.  tray packages containing “SIMPLE DISHES™ Rigatoni with Meatballs and a Mushroom Cream Sauce” with case code #19036, case UPC Code of 1-07-42753- 34710-6 and “BEST IF USED BY” “10/09/18” through “11/25/18”.  Unit UPC 7-42753-34710-9.

The products subject to recall bear the establishment number “ P-22102B” or “M-22102B” on the side of the product package. These items were shipped retail locations in California, Connecticut, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan and North Carolina.

The problem was discovered on Oct. 4, 2018 by the establishment’s research and development department during routine internal testing. FSIS was notified on Oct. 10, 2018.

There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about an injury or illness should contact a healthcare provider.

FSIS is concerned that some product may be in consumer’s refrigerators or freezers. Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.

FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify recalling firms notify their customers of the recall and that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers.

Media and consumers with questions regarding the recall can contact Valley Fine Foods customer service line, at 844-833-6888.

Consumers with food safety questions can “Ask Karen,” the FSIS virtual representative available 24 hours a day at AskKaren.gov or via smartphone at m.askkaren.gov. The toll-free USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline 888-MPHotline (888-674-6854) is available in English and Spanish and can be reached from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday. Recorded food safety messages are available 24 hours a day. The online Electronic Consumer Complaint Monitoring System can be accessed 24 hours a day at: http://www.fsis.usda.gov/reportproblem.

Posted in Food, Health, New Bern

October 10th, 2018 by newbernpostadmin

Due to the projected forecast of Hurricane Michael, Craven County Schools will be closed Thursday, Oct. 11 for students and staff of the eight schools that reopened this week, along with Early College Campuses. Officials will monitor the situation before deciding whether school should be closed Friday, as well.

Students and staff of the 15 other school sites that had not yet reopened due to continuing issues from Hurricane Florence will remain closed..

Schools affected by the Thursday closure are Oaks Road Academy, Creekside Elementary, Ben D. Quinn Elementary, Bridgeton Elementary, Vanceboro Farm Life Elementary, Grover C. Fields Middle, New Bern High, and West Craven High.

Custodians and maintenance staff are asked to report as normal unless contacted by their immediate supervisor.

Central Office Staff should plan to report if safely able to do so.

District officials will continue to monitor the storm during the next 24 hours and share any updated information regarding Friday as soon as possible.

Posted in Craven County Schools, Education, Hurricane, New Bern

October 9th, 2018 by newbernpostadmin

Approved counties: Currently nine North Carolina counties are approved for Direct Housing: Brunswick, Carteret, Columbus, Craven, Duplin, Jones, Onslow, Pender and Robeson.

FEMA understands that rental resources and housing are limited in some areas. FEMA is working closely with the State of North Carolina to implement a targeted strategy to provide other forms of temporary housing to best meet the needs of displaced survivors.

FEMA has been participating in the state-led housing task force since Hurricane Florence first made landfall in North Carolina.

The state and FEMA are implementing a multi-pronged approach to temporarily house displaced survivors. Solutions are tailored to the individual needs and situations of survivors based on how quickly their homes can be repaired to a safe, sanitary, secure condition and the availability of housing options in their communities.

Based upon the needs identified by the State of North Carolina, FEMA is providing two forms of Direct Temporary Housing Assistance. The following Transportable Temporary Housing Units are available:

  • Recreation Vehicles (RVs) provide a timely, effective interim solution for most households with a high degree of confidence that repairs can be completed in less than a year, ideally within six months.
  • Manufactured Housing Units (MHUs) provide a longer-term solution for survivors whose repairs will take longer to complete due to higher degree of damage.

FEMA contacts households who potentially qualify for an RV or MHU through the Pre-Placement Interview process to determine whether they need Direct Housing and, if so, what type of housing they require based on the size and needs of the household, including any people with disabilities or other access or functional needs.

FEMA will identify households that may be able to have an RV or MHU placed on their property or in a commercial park.

Direct housing solutions FEMA implements are temporary in nature and are not permanent dwellings.

During a housing mission, federal contractors are managed and monitored by FEMA inspectors. Contractors must adhere to all applicable laws, codes and requirements.

Continuous coordination among FEMA, the state, counties and municipalities regarding the installation of transportable temporary housing units is a vital part of this mission.

The state and FEMA are coordinating with municipalities and counties regarding the requirements of local ordinances, zoning, transportation requirements, occupancy inspections, setbacks and more.

The state and FEMA are also coordinating the temporary housing effort with floodplain managers, environmental regulators, historic preservation officers, utility providers and other authorities identified by the state or municipalities.

The State of North Carolina and FEMA will be implementing additional programs in the coming days and weeks.

Survivors displaced from their homes due to Hurricane Florence must first apply for disaster assistance to be considered for FEMA programs such as Transitional Sheltering Assistance, financial rental assistance, grants for repairs to make their homes safe, sanitary and secure, and other forms of assistance.

Survivors can apply online at DisasterAssistance.gov or by calling the disaster assistance helpline at 800-621- 3362 (voice, 711 or VRS) or 800-462-7585 (TTY). In-person American Sign Language (ASL) interpreters are available by request by calling or texting 202-655-8824. (If possible, please allow 24 hours to schedule an interpreter).

Posted in FEMA, Housing, Hurricane, Infrastructure, New Bern

October 9th, 2018 by newbernpostadmin

Gov. Roy Cooper directed $25 million from the North Carolina Education Lottery Fund on Tuesday to speed repairs to K-12 public schools damaged by Hurricane Florence.

“Students need to get back to learning and educators need to get back to teaching, but many school districts can’t afford the repairs schools need,” Cooper said. “The lives of thousands of students, teachers and families are on hold and they need our help to recover.”

While many schools have reopened since Hurricane Florence struck last month, seven North Carolina school systems remain closed, keeping more than 130 schools out of operation and nearly 90,000 students out of class.

Just four of Craven County’s 23 public schools were open for class on Monday. Three schools in Jones County will have to be entirely rebuilt.

Several affected school districts have depleted most of their contingency funds and need immediate financial assistance to repair roofs, flooring and electrical wiring, eradicate mold and mildew and replace furniture to get schools reopened.

The emergency funds will be administered by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. Priority will be given to district and charter schools in Brunswick, Craven, Duplin, Jones, New Hanover, Onslow, Pender and Robeson counties that have immediate repair needs and are not currently in operation.

Some of the repairs should be reimbursable by federal disaster recovery funds. Transferring the money now gives schools quicker help and allows them to retain contractors to speed repairs.

Posted in Craven County Schools, Education, FEMA, Hurricane, New Bern, Politics, State news, State politics

October 9th, 2018 by newbernpostadmin

Craven County Schools will provide two information sessions for parents and community stakeholders to provide details regarding the process and scope of work needed at facilities so students and staff are able to return to the safest environment possible.

Robert Herrick P.E. CIH, external industrial hygienist, will be on site to help answer questions about the procedures being completed at each school site as well as the desired outcomes.

The first session will take place on Wednesday, Oct. 10, at p.m. The second session will be on Friday, Oct. 12, at 9 a.m. Both sessions will be held at The Board of Education located at 3600 Trent Road, New Bern.

Posted in Craven County Schools, Hurricane, New Bern

October 5th, 2018 by newbernpostadmin

The original plan for Craven Thirty included a large, robust area for commercial and light industrial development.

Remember back in  2012, all the buzz about Craven Thirty? All that sweet, sweet new retail space, a multiplex theater, and new neighborhoods? You probably also remember how last year Craven Thirty morphed into West Craven, with less focus on business and more focus on residential.

Now, more than a year later, West Craven has emerged into the public eye again. Its developer, Weyerhaeuser NR Company, is asking for the city to enter into a development agreement. It is on the Board of Aldermen’s agenda for next Tuesday, when the board is expected to set a date for a public hearing.

And this latest version of West Craven looks a lot like the original Craven Thirty, but with even more commercial space.

Zoning codes are: C-3 commercial, R-6 residential, I-2 light industrial, A-5F agriculture district.

The city entered into a development agreement with Weyerhaeuser Real Estate Development Company in September 2010 for what was to become Craven Thirty. The city annexed the 550-acres Craven Thirty property in December 2012.

A ribbon cutting was conducted by then-Gov. Bev Perdue, and construction was announced to begin in spring 2013. Some streets were put in, along with other infrastructure, but nothing else was built during he intervening six years. Blame the economy.

The revised and renamed project would include just under 250 acres for residential development, just under 250 acres of commercial development, just over 47 acres for light industrial, and just over 27 acres of agriculture forestry district with low-density residential uses.

The plan calls for a total of 1,500 residential units phased in over 15 years, 500,000 square feet of non-residential space, a 150-room hotel sometime during the first five years, and 10 acres for a private school, also during the first five years.

The agreement establishes the development phasing sequences for the project, establishes a Master Development Plan and development review process that can accommodate the timing, phasing and flexibility of the project, coordinates the construction and design of infrastructure that will serve the project and the community at large, confirms the dedication and/or provision of public amenities by the developer, and provides assurances to the developer that it may proceed with the project in accordance with the approved original zoning and the terms of this agreement without encountering future changes in ordinances, regulations, technical standards or policies that would affect its ability to develop the relevant parcels under the approved zoning and the terms hereof.

The project will include small neighborhoods, a walkable village area, and connections to open space that will “support and reinforce the City of New Bern as an attractive place to live, work and recreate.” The size and scale of the project requires a long-term commitment of both public and private resources and requires careful integration between the programming of public capital facilities, the phasing of development and the development review and approval process.

The West Craven site is well suited for access from all parts of New Bern, or it will be. It is located at the intersection of U.S. 70 and the N.C. 43 connector. There are plans to extend the N.C. 43 connector from where it now ends just west of U.S. 70, all the way through to U.S. 17.

Posted in Aldermen, Board of Aldermen, Business, Community, Mayor, New Bern, New Bern business and commerce, Planning and Zoning

%d bloggers like this: