Category: New Bern

February 21st, 2019 by newbernpostadmin

Craven Community College’s (Craven CC) Adult Enrichment Program (AEP) will host a symposium entitled “Stop the Cravin’!” in an effort to promote substance abuse education, prevention and intervention.

This free event will take place at Orringer Hall on the New Bern Campus from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Thursday, March 14.

The event will feature a diverse panel of speakers from local health care providers, local and state law enforcement and community-based organizations. It will provide statistics for the area, health effects and the science behind the many aspects of addiction, case studies and firsthand accounts from those in the medical field. There will also be perspectives shared by former addicts, an emergency room charge nurse and local law enforcement.

Professional panelists include Kenneth W. Wilkins, Jr., MD, FACP, endoscopist and president of Coastal Carolina Health Care, PA; Matt Knight of the NC Task Force for Safe Schools and NC Alcohol Law Enforcement (ALE) branch; Henry D. Beckwith, PsyD, a licensed psychologist; and Nadine Williamson, a certified substance abuse counselor.

Those in attendance will have the opportunity to: participate in a Q&A, learn how to recognize the signs and symptoms of opioid and related substance abuse issues, how to intervene and prevent future addictions. Equipping people with knowledge so they know what to do in such situations can ensure that loved ones don’t become just another statistic.

“Our goal is to raise awareness of the substance abuse epidemic that is steadily increasing and affecting our community and communities throughout the country, and in turn aid in the prevention of their use,” said Megan Johnson, AEP coordinator. “It is our hope that this symposium will be of great benefit to those who have been touched by this crisis and who are impacted in their daily personal and professional lives.”

Preregistration is not required and CEUs are available for eligible professionals. Doors open at 7:45 a.m.

This event is sponsored by Craven Community College, the CCHC Foundation, the Harold H. Bate Foundation, ABC of Craven County, Coastal Coalition and Trillium Health Resources.

For more information, contact Johnson at 252-638-7273 or johnsonm@cravencc.edu.

Posted in Community, Community issues, Craven Community College, Health, New Bern, Public safety

February 19th, 2019 by newbernpostadmin

A BSH forklift is unloaded at Craven Community College, to be used in a training program as the manufacturer ramps up its workforce.

BSH Home Appliances, one of the world’s leading manufacturers of home appliances, is expanding the workforce at its New Bern manufacturing and assembly lines to meet demands for its products.

Working in collaboration with Craven Community College (Craven CC) and Blue Arbor Staffing (BAS), BSH is seeking to add approximately 50 new employees to its current workforce.

Craven CC will offer a Manufacturing Career Pathway (MCP) program from March 11-April 11 to help train and screen potential employees. The MCP will be dedicated specifically to the initiative to enhance the success for individuals wanting to start a career with BSH.

This program will provide training in the following topics: Intro to Manufacturing, Forklift Operator Certificate, Lean Yellow Belt, OSHA 10-Hour Safety, Workplace Ethics and Intro to Microsoft Word. Students will also receive hands-on training with mock simulators.

Students who complete the program will work through BAS. BAS will arrange an interview between the candidate and BSH. Candidates chosen after the interview process will start in a temporary position and work toward permanent placement. 

Craven CC offers MCP programs throughout the year that conclude with interviews from local manufacturers for potential direct-hire positions. At the conclusion of Craven CC’s last MCP class, 55% of the students were offered direct hire positions with local industries, 18 percent chose to further their education through Craven CC by enrolling in a trade program and 100 percent were asked to complete applications for potential employment through local employment agencies.

For additional information on the program, contact Eddie Foster, Craven CC executive director of environmental safety and corporate training, at 252-638-3919 or fostere@cravencc.edu. To register, contact Cat Johnson at 252-633-0857 or johnsonc@cravencc.edu.

Posted in Business, Community, Craven Community College, Economy, Economy and Employment, Education, New Bern

February 12th, 2019 by newbernpostadmin

Request will be made at Tuesday’s Board of Aldermen meeting

New Bern community members and non-local activists will urge the New Bern Board of Aldermen to “Ban the Box” for hiring city employees at its meeting on Tuesday, Feb. 12.

“Ban the Box” is a hiring practice that encourages employers to identify potential hires with the best skills and experience and delay asking applicants about their criminal records until after a conditional offer is made.

Durham and Carrboro are among cities in North Carolina that have already adopted this “fair chance” hiring practice.

Ban the Box is a movement started in the early 2000s by All of Us or None, a national organization created and led by individuals directly impacted by incarceration and the criminal legal system.

People who have been involved in the criminal justice system often face collateral consequences, difficulties people face in finding housing, education, and employment because of a criminal record.  

Trouble finding employment is one of the most common collateral consequences that people face upon release. Those who have a record and disclose it on their initial job application are 50 percent less likely to receive a callback than their peers without a record.

Ban the Box programs do not prevent employers from asking about an applicant’s criminal record, but rather calls for employers to remove the initial question about criminal records from job applications (“the box”) and delay any related questions until after a conditional offer is made. This process ensures the best person is being hired for the job and also allows the employer to continue to make decisions about the relevancy of the record to the job.

What: Public comments on ‘Ban the Box’ at New Bern Board of Alderman meeting

When: Tuesday, Feb. 12 at 6 p.m.

Where: City Hall Courtroom, 300 Pollock St., New Bern

Who: New Bern community members and representatives from All of Us or None – NC and the Southern Coalition for Social Justice Clean Slate Project

Posted in Aldermen, Board of Aldermen, Community, Community issues, Crime, Economy, Economy and Employment, Housing, Mayor, New Bern

February 10th, 2019 by newbernpostadmin

“Feb 10, 2019 Greenville, NC – After faithfully representing the people of Eastern North Carolina in Congress and the state legislature for over 34 years, Congressman Walter B. Jones (NC-3) passed away this afternoon in Greenville, North Carolina.  He was 76.  

“Congressman Jones was a man of the people.  With a kind heart and the courage of his convictions, he dedicated his life to serving his Savior and to standing up for Americans who needed a voice. He was a champion for our men and women in uniform and their families, always mindful of their service and sacrifice. 

“Congressman Jones will long be remembered for his honesty, faith and integrity.  He was never afraid to take a principled stand.  He was known for his independence, and widely admired across the political spectrum.  Some may not have agreed with him, but all recognized that he did what he thought was right. 

“He will be sorely missed.”          

Posted in New Bern, Politics

February 9th, 2019 by newbernpostadmin

The Board of Aldermen meets Tuesday for two separate sessions, a regular meeting starting at 6 p.m. and a work session covering utility rates starting at 3 p.m.

During Tuesday’s regular meeting, here are some of the more interesting agenda items:

10. Presentation on NC Global TransPark Authority.

Allen Thomas, Director of the North Carolina Global TransPark (“GTP”), was scheduled to make a presentation before the Board last July, but cancelled due to illness. He has rescheduled that presentation for this meeting.

11. Presentation by Craven County Board of Elections.

Melani Wray, Director of the Craven County Board of Elections, will make a presentation that covers a cost analysis of the City’s election process. She will also discuss the advantages of changing from a nonpartisan election/runoff method to a nonpartisan plurality election.

12. Presentation on Downtown Parking Update.

(Ward 1) Billy Faulkenberry and Lynn Harakal, Executive Director of Swiss Bear, will update the Board on the downtown parking enforcement.

15. Presentation on Ban-the-Box.

Whitley Carpenter, Staff Attorney with The Southern Coalition for Social Justice, will be joined by Corey Purdie and Angaza Laughinghouse to make a presentation on the Ban-the-Box movement.

Ban the Box is the name of an international campaign by civil rights groups and advocates for ex-offenders, aimed at persuading employers to remove from their hiring applications the check box that asks if applicants have a criminal record.

18. Consider Adopting a Resolution Approving a License/Use Agreement with the Federal Emergency Management Agency.

(Ward 5) The Federal Emergency Management Agency (“FEMA”) has requested to lease office space at the old Water Resources building located at 2825 Neuse Boulevard. The proposed agreement provides for their use of the building through June 30, 2019 at no cost. FEMA will be using the office space to serve the citizens of New Bern and surrounding areas following the devastation from Hurricane Florence. 

Here is the full agenda:

CITY OF NEW BERN, 300 Pollock Street, P.O. Box 1129 New Bern, NC 28563-1129 . (252) 636-4000

Dana E. Outlaw Mayor

Mark A. Stephens City Manager

Memo to: Mayor and Board of Aldermen From: Mark A. Stephens, City Manager Date: February 8, 2019

Re: February 12, 2019 Agenda Explanations

1. Meeting  opened  by Mayor  Dana E. Outlaw. Prayer Coordinated by Mayor Outlaw. Pledge of Allegiance.

2. Roll Call.

3. Request and Petition of Citizens.

This section of the Agenda is titled Requests and Petitions of Citizens. This is an opportunity for public comment, and we thank you for coming to the Board of Aldermen meeting tonight to share your views. We value all citizen input.

Speaker comments are limited to a maximum of 4 minutes during the public comment period. At the conclusion of 4 minutes, each speaker shall leave the podium. Comments will be directed to the full board, not to an individual board member or staff member. Although the board is interested in hearing your comments, speakers should not expect any comments, action or deliberation from the board on any issue raised during the public comment period.

In the board’s discretion, it may refer issues to the appropriate city officials or staff for further investigation. If an organized group is present to speak on a common issue, please designate one person to present the group’s comment, which shall be limited to a maximum of 4 minutes.

Consent Agenda

4. Consider Adopting a Resolution to Close Specific Streets for the Neuse River Bridge Run.

(Ward 1) The Neuse River Bridge Run is slated for March 23, 2019. Accordingly, John Serumgard, Race Director, the event, has requested the 200 block of East Front Street be closed from 4 a.m. to 1 p.m. and the 200 block of South Front Street be closed from 5 a.m. until 1 p.m. The organizers also plan to hold a “Super Kids Run” on March 22, 2019 from 12 p.m. to 9 p.m. at Union Point Park, and the Director of Parks and Recreation has authorized the closure of the park streets during this time. A memo from Foster Hughes, Director of Parks and Recreation, is attached.

5. Consider Adopting a Resolution to Close Specific Streets for the Great Glow Run.

(Ward 1) Kathy Lewis, Officer Manager for Easter Seals UCP, has requested specific streets be closed on April 13, 2019 from 6:30 p.m. until 8:30 p.m. for the annual Great Glow Run. The streets to be closed are the 200-700 blocks of East Front Street, a portion of the 800 block of North Craven Street, 700-800 blocks of Howard Street, 100-600 blocks of Queen Street, and 600-800 blocks of George Street. This Easter Seals fundraiser also promotes awareness. A memo from Mr. Hughes is attached.

6. Consider Adopting a Revised Resolution to Close Specific Streets for the Black History Month Parade.

(Ward 1) After receiving a request from Victor Taylor with Vision Forward, the Board adopted a resolution on January 22, 2019 to close specific streets on February 16, 2019 for the annual Black history Month Parade. That resolution failed to include approval of the requested rain date of February 23, 2019. The resolution has been revised to include this date, and all other information remains the same with respect to the affected streets. A memo from Mr. Hughes is attached along with copies of the application, a map of the parade route, and the resolution approved in January.

7. Consider Adopting a Resolution to Portions of Spencer Avenue for the Ghent Neighborhood Mardi Gras Parade.

(Ward 1) Michael Genest, President of the Ghent Neighborhood Association, has requested the 1400-2000 blocks of Spencer Avenue be closed to vehicular traffic on March 2, 2019 from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. for the association’s annual Mardi Gras Parade and block party. A memo from Mr. Hughes, a copy of the application and a parade map are included in the backup documentation.

8. Approve Minutes.

Minutes from the January 15, 2019 special meeting, January 22, 2019 regular

meeting, January 26, 2019 special meeting, and January 26, 2019 annual retreat are provided for review and approval.

______

9. Presentation of Longevity Certificates.

Employment service is recognized at five-year increments. A roster is enclosed of all employees who are eligible to receive a service certificate for the period of July­ December 2018. Some of these employees will be present at the meeting, and certificates will be on hand for the Mayor to present. Sharon Koprowski, Assistant Director of Human Resources, will be available to assist with the presentation. The Board is asked to extend a handshake of appreciation to the employees.

10. Presentation on NC Global TransPark Authority.

Allen Thomas, Director of the North Carolina Global TransPark (“GTP”), was scheduled to make a presentation before the Board last July, but cancelled due to illness. He has rescheduled that presentation for this meeting.

11. Presentation by Craven County Board of Elections.

Melani Wray, Director of the Craven County Board of Elections, will make a presentation that covers a cost analysis of the City’s election process. She will also discuss the advantages of changing from a nonpartisan election/runoff method to a nonpartisan plurality election.

12. Presentation on Downtown Parking Update.

(Ward 1) Billy Faulkenberry and Lynn Harakal, Executive Director of Swiss Bear, will update the Board on the downtown parking enforcement.

13. Presentation on African American Heritage & Cultural Center of New Bern Project.

(Ward 1) Carol Becton, a representative with the African American Heritage & Cultural Center, will make a presentation on the center’s vision, as well as its plans to celebrate Juneteenth in 2019.

14. Presentation on Reliable Public Power.

Charles Bauschard, Director of Public Utilities, will make a presentation regarding the City’s application for the American Public Power Association’s designation as a Reliable Public Power Provider (“RP3”).

15. Presentation on Ban-the-Box.

Whitley Carpenter, Staff Attorney with The Southern Coalition for Social Justice, will be joined by Corey Purdie and Angaza Laughinghouse to make a presentation on the Ban-the-Box movement.

16. Consider Adopting a Resolution Approving a Human Resources Policy.

As a follow-up to the previous presentation, a Resolution approving a Human Resources Policy is proposed.

17. Receive Public Comment and Consider Adopting a Resolution Naming a Currently Unnamed Street as Sheryl Drive.

(Ward 4) In the area of Glenburnie Road, an unnamed street connects Elizabeth Avenue and Amhurst Boulevard. In 2013 and 2015, a proposed development named Quail Forest was reviewed and the right-of-way for this roadway dedicated, but not officially named. The proposed name, Sheryl Drive, was reviewed and approved by E911. Staff has met with adjacent property owners regarding the name proposal. It is requested the Board receive public comments on this naming and then consider adopting a resolution to establish the name.

18. Consider Adopting a Resolution Approving a License/Use Agreement with the Federal Emergency Management Agency.

(Ward 5) The Federal Emergency Management Agency (“FEMA”) has requested to lease office space at the old Water Resources building located at 2825 Neuse Boulevard. The proposed agreement provides for their use of the building through June 30, 2019 at no cost. FEMA will be using the office space to serve the citizens of New Bern and surrounding areas following the devastation from Hurricane Florence.

19. Consider Adopting a Resolution to Accept a Deed in Lieu of Foreclosure of Tax Lien.

(Ward 1) Craven County pursued foreclosure on 209 Lawson Street for delinquent ad valorem taxes owed to the County. At the time of the foreclosure, there were also delinquent taxes owed to the City. A commissioner’s deed was recorded on August 18, 2018 conveying the property to the County, which resulted in the City’s tax liens remaining intact. In order to avoid foreclosure by the City to collect those taxes, the County proposes a deed to convey the property to the City and County jointly, with the deed specifying the amount of both the County and City’s taxes, interest, liens, fees and costs as of August 18, 2018. The resolution authorizes the recording of the proposed deed and accepts the same in lieu of foreclosure of the City’s tax lien.

20. Consider Adopting a Resolution Authorizing the Installation of Additional Street Lights.

(Ward 5) Time McKean of 2800 Millinder Lane has requested additional street lighting at the intersection of South Glenburnie Road and Millinder Lane. The Department of Public Utilities evaluated the area and determined the current lighting does not meet the City’s light standard. The installation of one street light will cost approximately $574.96, and the monthly utility charge for service will be $8.44. A memo from Charles Bauschard, Director of Public Utilities, is attached along with other supporting documentation.

21. Appointment(s).

  1. Raymond Layton’s second term on the Planning and Zoning Board has expired, and he is ineligible for reappointment. Alderman Kinsey is requested to make a new appointment to fill this vacancy. The new appointee shall serve a three­ year term.
  2. Sonny Aluzzo’s first term on the Planning and Zoning Board has expired, and he is eligible for reappointment. Alderman Aster is asked to consider reappointing Mr. Aluzzo or make a new appointment for a three-year term.
  3. Jerry Walker’s first term on the Planning and Zoning Board has expired, and he is eligible for reappointment. Alderman Bengel is asked to consider reappointing Mr. Walker or make a new appointment for a three-year term.
  4. Carol Williams’ second term on the Planning and Zoning Board has expired, and she is ineligible for reappointment. Alderwoman Harris is requested to make a new appointment to fill this vacancy. The new appointee shall serve a three­ year term.
  5. Joseph Anderson has resigned from the Historic Preservation Commission. Alderman Bengel is asked to make an appointment to fill the remainder of Mr. Anderson’s term, which expires on June 13, 2019.
  6. Rose Williams’ appointment on the New Bern Appearance Commission expired February 8, 2019. She is eligible for reappointment, or a new appointment can be made to allow others an opportunity to serve. The appointee will serve a three-year term. The ordinance provides appointees shall be residents of the City’s planning and zoning jurisdiction and shall, when possible, have had special training or experience in a design field such as architecture, landscape design, horticulture, city planning, or a closely-related field.
  7. Mattie Tatum’s appointment on the New Bern Appearance Commission will expire February 22, 2019. She is eligible for reappointment, or a new appointment can be made to allow others an opportunity to serve. The appointee will serve a three-year term. The ordinance provides appointees shall be residents of the City’s planning and zoning jurisdiction and shall, when possible, have had special training or experience in a design field such as architecture, landscape design, horticulture, city planning, or a closely-related field.

22. Attorney’s Report.

23. City Manager’s Report. 

24. New Business.

25. Closed Session.

26. Adjourn.

Posted in Aldermen, Board of Aldermen, Downtown New Bern, Economy, Economy and Employment, Elections, FEMA, Infrastructure, Mayor, New Bern, New Bern business and commerce, Planning and Zoning

February 9th, 2019 by newbernpostadmin

The Board of Aldermen meets Tuesday to consider the adjustment. 

Here is the background information:

 

CITY OF NEW BERN BOARD OF ALDERMEN

WORK SESSION FEBRUARY 12, 2019- 3:00 P.M.

CITY HALL COURTROOM 300 POLLOCK STREET

 

 

  1. Discussion and Consideration of Wholesale Electric Cost

INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES REQUIRING SPECIAL ASSISTANCE SHOULD CALL 639-7501 NO LATER THAN 3 P.M. THE DATE OF THE MEETING

 

Background

 

ELECTRICITIES  I N O R T H C A R O L I N A, I N C,

To: North Carolina Eastern Municipal Power Agency Board of Commissioners and Alternates

FROM: Kathy L. Moyer, Vice President, Operations

DATE: January 28, 2019

SUBJECT: DAY NOTICE OF NCEMPA WHOLESALE RATE CHANGE

 The Board of Directors adopted, at its meeting on January 25, 2019, the following changes to NCEMPA’s wholesale power service rates based on the recommendations of the NCEMPA Rate Committee and the NCEMPA Board of Commissioners:

  1. A 1.2% increase to Full Requirements rate effective April 1, 2019 through Full Requirements Bulk Power Supply Schedule FR-4;
  2. Continued suspension of Rider 1 through September 2019 to retain the 2017 FRPPA true-up credit of $4.4M within working capital.

These changes were reviewed in detail by the NCEMPA Rate Committee at its meeting on January 10, 2019, and a summary of the information was presented to the NCEMPA Board of Commissioners at its January 23, 2019 meeting. 

In accordance  with the North Carolina General Statutes, Section 159B-10, the changes  to  the rate schedules adopted by the Board of Directors will become effective unless rejected within 30 days by the vote of 2/3 in number of the NCEMPA Board of Commissioners.

Thus, if the Board of Commissioners  desires to  reject the rates adopted by the Board of Directors, it must take action prior to February 27, 2019. If the Board of Commissioners takes no action, the rate schedule and riders adopted will become effective as noted.

Please contact me at (919) 760-6225 if you wish to discuss further these wholesale rate changes as adopted by the Board of Directors.

The attachments include an explanation of these rate changes together with marked copies of the rate schedule and riders listed.

Attachments

cc:  NCEMPA City Managers NCEMPA Utility Directors NCEMPA Finance Directors

Gary Brunault, GOS Sr. Management Staff

ElectriCities Board of Directors

KM/ts                                                                                                      919.760.6000

1427 Meadow Wood Blvd.

Raleigh, North Carolina 27604               www.electricities.com

North Carolina Eastern Municipal Power Agency Wholesale Power Service Rate Changes

Approved by the ElectriCities Board of Directors on January 25, 2019

The Board of Directors adopted, at its meeting on January 25, 2019, the following changes to NCEMPA’s wholesale power service rates based on the recommendations of the NCEMPA Rate Committee and the NCEMPA Board of Commissioners.

SUMMARY OF WHOLESALE POWER SERVICE RATE CHANGES:

  1. A 1.2% increase to Full Requirements rate effective April 1, 2019 through Full Requirements Bulk Power Supply Schedule FR-4;
  2. Continued suspension of Rider No. 1 through September 2019 to retain the 2017 FRPPA true-up credit of $4.4M within working

Each item is described in more detail below:

FULL REQUIREMENTS RATE REVISION

The Rate Committee met on January 10, 2019 to review updated cost projections for NCEMPA. The 2019-2023 DEP Production System Projections were generally in-line with previous projections reviewed in September 2018. Due to the net effect of the updated cost projections and to maintain target working capital levels, the Rate Committee recommends a 1.2% rate increase effective April 1, 2019. The Demand and Energy rates will be adjusted to align the FR rate structure with DEP’s updated cost projections. Beyond 2019, the rate path includes a projected 3.0% rate increase in 2020. The updated FR-4 rate is proposed to be effective April 1, 2019.

RIDERNO. l,FRPPA TRUE-UP CHARGE/CREDIT

The Rate Committee recommends continued suspension of Rider No. 1 through September 2019 to retain the 2017 FRPPA true-up credit of $4.4M within working capital. Rider No. 1 allows for the suspension and reinstatement of Rider No. 1 on a year-to-year basis upon the recommendation of Board of Commissioners and approval of Board of Directors. In September 2018, the Board of Directors approved suspension of Rider No. 1, keeping the $4.4M FRPPA true-up credit in working capital until the January 2019 Rate Committee meeting to provide for planning flexibility.

Effective: April 1, 2012.&

 NORTH CAROLINA EASTERN MUNICIPAL POWER AGENCY MEMBER ELECTRIC RATE SCHEDULE

FULL REQUIREMENTS BULK POWER SUPPLY SCHEDULE FR-

  1. APPLICABILITY

Service under this Full Requirements Bulk Power Supply Rate Schedule is applicable to all Members as defined in the Full Requirements Power Sales Agreement between North Carolina Eastern Municipal Power Agency (“Power Agency”) and its Members, dated as of April 24, 2015 (the “FRPSA”), and is subject to the provisions of the FRPSA and the Debt Service Support Contract between Power Agency and its Members, dated as of April 24, 2015 (the “DSSC”). This rate schedule, as supplemented and amended, is applicable for the sale of Full Requirements Bulk Power Supply, as defined in the FRPSA, for use and resale from existing facilities of adequate type and service. This rate schedule is applicable commencing with the billing month of April, 201&2. to be billed in May, 201&.2_.

.      2. FULL REQUIREMENTS MONTHLY CHARGES

Full Requirements Monthly Charges shall consist of the following Demand Charge and Energy Charge:

Demand Charge:

$ 22.4 per  kW of  Billing Demand Energy Charge:

2.530M94 ¢ per kWh of Billing Energy

  • DETERMINATION OF BILLING DEMAND AND BILLING ENERGY
    1. Determination of Billing Demand

Billing Demand for each Member shall be the average kW measured at the Delivery Point, as such term is defined in the FRPSA, in the 60-minute interval during the current billing month, which is coincident with Duke Energy Progress’s (“DEP”) Monthly Peak Demand, as such term is defined in the Full Requirements Power Purchase Agreement between Power Agency and DEP, dated as of September 5, 2014 (the “FRPPA”), less any capacity allocation, in kW, from the Southeastern Power Administration (“SEPA”) at such point of delivery, but not less than zero.

           2,Determination of Billing Energy

Billing Energy shall be the total energy measured during the current billing month at the Delivery Point, in kWh, less any energy allocation, in kWh, from SEPA at such point of delivery.

  1. GENERAL

Pursuant to the FRPSA and the DSSC, the Monthly Bill will include the Full Requirements Monthly Charges, specified above, and amounts calculated in accordance with the applicable Rider(s) to this Full Requirements Bulk Power Supply Rate Schedule, which are incorporated herein and made a part hereof. Nothing in this Full Requirements Bulk Power Supply Rate Schedule shall be construed to prevent Power Agency from reviewing and amending this Rate Schedule or the Riders hereto and the charges contained herein from time to time.

Posted in Board of Aldermen, Utilities, Utilities

February 7th, 2019 by newbernpostadmin

The Rotary Club of New Bern’s Sham-Rockin’ 2019, A St. Patrick’s Celebration, is coming Friday, March 15. The event will be held again at the North Carolina History Center, overlooking the Trent River.

Doors open at 6 p.m and the Sham-Rockin’ will continue until 10 p.m.  The Chelsea Restaurant will serve up corned beef and cabbage from 6:00 – 8:30 pm.  During dinner, Tom & Dahlin’ of Tom’s Tunes will play and sing Irish & Celtic songs.  After dinner, dance to the popular band, Trainwreck! Cash bar of beer, wine and soda and popcorn available all night.

Tickets include dinner and admission and are $20 in advance and $25 at the door. Tickets can be purchased at Mitchell Hardware and online at www.NewBernRotaryClub.org with a link to the EventBrite page.  

Sponsorship for this event is available. Contact Nancy Houyoux at nhouyoux233@gmail.com or visit The Rotary Club of New Bern website at www.newbernrotaryclub.org/

Sham-Rockin’ is the club’s annual fundraiser to support local projects and programs like The Boys and Girls Club of New Bern, Backpack Blessings, and Craven County Partners in Education, MERCI Clinic, New Bern Marching Band and so much more.

For more information on Sham-Rockin’ 2019, A St. Patrick’s Celebration, go to www.NewBernRotaryClub.org or visit them on Facebook.

Posted in Entertainment, New Bern

February 6th, 2019 by newbernpostadmin

Duke Energy crews are in the New Bern area to repair infrastructure that was damaged in December causing a widespread power outage.

A Duke Energy contractor was performing vegetation management services on Dec. 19 when a transmission line was severed leaving City of New Bern customers without power for about seven hours.  A temporary fix restored power until permanent repairs could be made.

Duke Energy started making permanent repairs to the system on Monday  The work is scheduled to be complete on by the end of February.

City of New Bern electric customers are not expected to experience any power outages or fluctuations in service during this time.  If you do, contact Utility Control at 252-636-4070.

Utility Control is staffed 24 hours a day and allows the city to dispatch crews immediately in the event of a power outage.

Posted in Duke Energy, Public works, Utilities

February 6th, 2019 by newbernpostadmin

GateHouse Media reportedly refused to run a column titled “Media Under Siege” that, among other things, criticized the company.  The piece was written by Randy Miller, who retired from the Hawk Eye in Burlington, Iowa, a few years ago.  He continued to write a column for the paper but – due to the “Media Under Siege” piece — it appears his contributions are no longer welcome. GateHouse Media owns the New Bern Sun Journal. Miller’s column appears below. Used with permission of the author.

By Randy Miller

“Freedom of the press ensures that the abuse of every other freedom can be known, can be challenged and even defeated.”
— Kofi Annan

Late last week, The New Yorker ran a story titled “Does journalism have a future?” That follows by several weeks the naming of journalists worldwide as the “Person of the Year” by Time magazine, a truly thoughtful and insightful choice.

I, too, fear for the future of those in my chosen profession. With our president calling any news outlet that publishes anything that portrays him in an unfavorable light “fake news” and “enemy of the people” and the proliferation of truly fake news on social media sites, is there still a place in the world for true journalists?

The New Yorker piece notes that “between 1970 and 2016, the year the American Society of News Editors quit counting, 500 or so daily newspapers went out of business; the rest cut news coverage, or shrank the paper’s size, or stopped producing a print edition, or did all of that, and it still wasn’t enough.”

The piece mostly covers the changes wrought by online media, like the Huffington Post and Brietbart News and BuzzFeed News, and their impact on large daily newspapers, but notes offhandedly that local papers through the years have often produced the best shoe leather journalists who went on to bigger and better jobs with the larger publications. That pipeline is drying up.
Ironically, since the president began calling the big national media companies “enemies of the people” most have seen a surge in readership and subscriptions, notably The New York Times. So there’s another of the president’s lies exposed when he repeatedly Tweets “the failing NYT.” No, it’s not failing. Saying it doesn’t make it so.

Attempting to control and demean traditional news sources is straight out of the playbook of autocratic rulers around the world, including Vladimir Putin in Russia. Control the message and you control the people. It’s that simple.
So we now have an autocratic president who lies about as often as he takes a breath. If this president isn’t removed from office soon, it will only get worse.

Americans today are inundated with media of all kinds and thus are becoming increasingly skeptical of all sources of information, which is bad for traditional journalists who are still committed to fact checking and obtaining their information from reliable sources.

Meanwhile, the more disturbing trend is that of big media companies buying up newspapers around the country and milking them for profits. Most could care less about covering the local communities they serve.

This newspaper is a good example. When I retired three years ago, there were more than 90 full-time employees with benefits on staff. Today, there are less than half that number, just two years after the paper was bought by Gatehouse Media. Do the math on how much that is saving the company.

Several rounds of buyouts and layoffs have decimated the staff. The newsroom had 24 full-time employees, as well as a host of part-timers, when I retired. That included four dayside editors, four nightside editors and six full-time reporters.

Today, there are eight full-timers in the newsroom, including two editors and two reporters, who also fill in on desk duties when needed. Although they make a valiant effort every day, there is no way they can adequately cover southeast Iowa and west-central Illinois with such limited resources.

I’m told they have hired another reporter who will begin work soon, but that’s putting a Band-Aid on a gaping wound.

As city editor, I often took random complaint calls from the public about something we covered or didn’t cover. Even fully staffed, we couldn’t be everywhere all the time. So I can’t imagine how many complaint calls they’re getting now.

In its Person of the Year edition, Time noted that 52 journalists were killed worldwide last year just for doing their jobs, the most notable Jamal Khashoggi, who was killed and dismembered at the Saudi Arabian Embassy in Turkey by agents of the Saudi government, a truly atrocious act.

The cover photo of the edition featured the remaining news staff at the Capital Gazette of Annapolis, Maryland. Five of their colleagues were shot and killed by a crazed shooter who walked into their newsroom one day and opened fire. Amazingly, they still put out a paper the following day.

So the question is, does journalism have a future? It damn well better have. Press freedom is guaranteed in the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution for a reason. It is essential to a functioning democracy.

But true journalism is under siege today, attacked by fringe elements on both the right and left, by fake news sites online, and by our current president. Reporting and commenting on news of the day is an evolving process, and especially so these days. But good journalism still matters, perhaps more so today than any time in recent memory.

Journalists know that on a daily basis they are going to get more criticism than praise for what they do. It’s just the nature of the job. So if you know a reporter or editor, regardless of the size of publication they work for, like veterans, thank them for doing their jobs to keep the public informed. What they do every day is that important.

Posted in Journalism, New Bern

February 6th, 2019 by newbernpostadmin

LANE CLOSED TODAY: Eastbound lane of George Street from Bern to Main. Detour signs are up. Should reopen around 5 p.m. Water Resources installing a new tap.

Posted in New Bern, Public works, Transportation

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