Category: Community

May 29th, 2019 by newbernpostadmin

On June 19, 2019, Eastern North Carolinians will celebrate JUNETEENTH with the launch of The African American Heritage & Cultural Center of New Bern.

June 19 is JUNETEENTH, the national celebration of the emancipation of formerly enslaved peoples. The AAHCC launch is June 19 from 6-8 p.m. at 408 Hancock St. in New Bern.

Rick Fisher, newly elected Board President said, “JUNETEENTH was chosen because of its significance to African Americans throughout the country. Launching on JUNETEENTH in New Bern demonstrates our organization’s commitment to presenting the historical impact and progression of African American heritage and culture in Eastern North Carolina.”

The African American Heritage & Cultural Center (AAHCC) launch on JUNETEENTH is one event among many planned that week throughout New Bern.

“Our leadership looks forward to all the events and encourages families throughout the region to come to New Bern for the JUNETEENTH celebrations,” Fisher said.

“We are planning an evening of fellowship, good traditional food, music, and art”, said Board Vice-President Ann Herndon. “I’m honored to be on the founding Board of Directors and look forward to AAHCC’s first public event.”

Details and tickets for the event are available on EventBrite. The program begins at 6 p.m. and registrants are encouraged to park in the nearby free parking lot and arrive by 5:45.

AAHCC is strategic group of community leaders, elected officials and nonprofit organization leaders that gathered early in 2018 to discuss the continuing need to increase the visibility of the heritage of eastern North Carolina’s African American community.

Beyond the recorded history of the region that is included in traditional educational environments exists an important legacy of remarkable and determined individuals who contributed to the development of this region. As 2018 discussion continued, these early AAHCC leaders determined to established a 501(c)(3) nonprofit which would collaborate with existing nonprofits, organizations and groups to secure resources to present a broad spectrum of the African American Experience.

Future AAHCC programs will include developing an oral history library with universal access, and presenting creative performances, seminars and lectures, exhibitions of artwork including murals, artifacts and personal collections, along with music, food and live art events.

ADDITIONAL JUNETEENTH EVENTS IN NEW BERN

AAHCC’s June 19 launch is one of many JUNETEENTH events throughout New Bern:

• Friday, June 14 at 5-8 p.m. JUNETEENTH Opening Reception featuring a month- long exhibit of eight local African American artists at Craven Arts Council, Bank of the Arts, 317 Middle Street

• Monday June 17 at 7 p.m. Juneteenth Week Kickoff with Charles Tendell Podcast

• Tuesday June 18, Community Service/Health Day Health and Mental Health Free Screenings at the OMEGA Center. Watch for publication of registration details

• JUNETEENTH Wednesday June 19 at 6-8 p.m. AAHCC Public Lunch – register on EventBrite.

• Thursday June 20 at 7 p.m. Tryon Palace African American Lecture, NC History Center

• Friday June 21 at 7 p.m. “Celebration of Cultures” hosted by Y.U.P. Annual Rooftop Social, 401 Middle Street. Registration required.

• Saturday June 22, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. DufFest Presents Juneteenth hosted by GDRC, Stanley White Field

• Saturday, June 22, HBCA DAY at Omega Center. Watch for publication of registration details

• Sunday June 23 is Community Freedom and Fellowship Day at Local Churches and Union Point Park Recreation. Watch for publication of details

• Sunday June 23 Gospel Concert being planned at OMEGA Center. Watch for publication of details

The African American Heritage & Cultural Center of New Bern is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization based in New Bern North Carolina and serving communities throughout Eastern North Carolina. Contact information: Post Office Box 1354, NBNC 28563-1354 or TheCenterofNewBern@gmail.com.

In early 2019, AAHCC became a nonprofit organization and elected is founding Board of Directors and Officers.

  • Officers are Rick Fisher – President
  • Ann Herndon – Vice-President
  • Kathy Adolph – Secretary
  • Jim Copland – Treasurer
  • Board Directors – Carol Bonner Becton, Maria Cho, and Tahira Coble Copland.
  • AAHCC is staffed by Executive Director Carrie Gallagher.

Posted in Activities, Community, Events, History

May 3rd, 2019 by newbernpostadmin

National Travel and Tourism Week 2019, the 36th annual celebration of the contributions and accomplishments of the U.S. travel industry, will take place on May 5-11.

This year’s theme is “Travel Matters,” a recognition of the innumerable ways in which travel enriches lives and strengthens communities. Each day of NTTW will spotlight a different example of why travel matters to America.

For New Bern and Craven County, travel and tourism are so vital that “Travel Matters” are not mere words.

“They are the economic engine for the city, the county, the state – the entire country,” said Sabrina Bengel, chairman of the Craven County Tourism Development Authority. “That’s true whether you are traveling to a campground or a 5-star resort.”

Tourism creates jobs that keeps local economies humming, and brings in sales taxes that pay for vital government services.

“‘Travel Matters’ is quite accurate,” said Tarshi P. McCoy, executive director of the New Bern-Craven County Convention & Visitor Center. “Tourism has an enormous effect on New Bern and Craven County and continues to grow each year.”

True, New Bern has been in recovery mode since Hurricane Florence struck in September 2018. Damage to DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel New Bern-Riverfront indefinitely reduced available downtown hotel rooms by 171 and left the city without its only full-service hotel.

Paradoxically, occupancy tax revenues actually increased to record levels since Hurricane Florence, Bengel said.

That’s one of those “silver lining” situations, as construction workers, insurance adjusters, government officials and others descended on New Bern in response to Hurricane Florence.

That surge is expected to subside by the last quarter of the year, about the same time that New Bern Riverfront Convention Center is scheduled to reopen fresh from repairs.

New Bern’s tourism industry continues to market the city’s unique and historic ambience, and there has been an uptick in business for the city’s Bed & Breakfasts. Pollock Street in downtown alone has six B&Bs offering around 43 rooms, all an easy walk from the Convention Center and other downtown attractions.

Having a major hotel and a convention center simultaneously out of commission affects the city’s ability to attract larger conventions, but the city has adjusted its strategies in order to focus on its many other strengths.

While the city may find it harder to attract large-scale conventions, its ambience and unparalleled services still suit smaller meetings and events.

“We can’t have full conventions but we can accommodate boards of directors,” Bengel said.

Case in point: PepsiCo continues to hold its annual meetings in New Bern, where Pepsi was invented.

Tarshi P. McCoy has been creative in addressing recent challenges while continuing to focus on New Bern’s entrenched strengths, Bengel said.

“The New Bern-Craven County Convention and Visitors Bureau works closely with the hospitality partners to ensure that we promote our amenities and educate travelers on everything the area has to offer,” McCoy said.

Downtown New Bern may have 171 fewer hotel rooms, but two other downtown hotels, Courtyard by Marriott New Bern and Bridgepoint Hotel and Marina, are open, and Havelock, a short drive away on U.S. Highway 70, offers 300-350 additional rooms, Bengel said.

Those amenities, coupled with value-added services including shuttle services, keep Craven County in the tourism game.

That’s not all. Downtown New Bern features a growing and vibrant arts and theatre community and a thriving night life. The area’s ambience is well suited for weddings and events, which by nature of their advanced planning provide stability for inn, venue, and restaurant bookings.

What is National Travel and Tourism Week?

Established in 1983 by President Reagan, National Travel and Tourism Week (NTTW) is the annual salute to travel in America.

During the first full week in May, communities nationwide unite around a common theme to showcase travel’s contributions to the economy and American jobs.

This year, the travel industry is coming together to celebrate why “Travel Matters,” spotlighting a different way travel matters each day to American jobs, economic growth and personal well-being.

 

SUNDAY: Travel matters to the economy.

Travel generated $2.5 trillion for the U.S. economy in 2018 across all U.S. industries. Here in New Bern, the travel industry generated $142.10 million to the local economy in 2017.

 

MONDAY: Travel matters to new experiences.

From our national parks to our diverse cities and our scenic small towns, travel is uniquely made in America. Our attractions, restaurants, shops, theme parks, music venues and more—and the people who make them possible—are the best in the world and showcase what makes America great.

 

TUESDAY: Travel matters to our jobs.

Travel supported 15.7 million U.S. jobs in 2018—that’s one in 10 American jobs, making travel the seventh largest employer in the private sector. Here in New Bern, the travel industry supports According to “Economic Impact of Travel on North Carolina Counties 2017,” prepared for Visit North Carolina by the U.S. Travel Association, the travel and tourism industry directly employed more than 1,170 people in Craven County. Total payroll generated by the tourism industry in Craven County was $29.06 million in 2017. State tax revenue in Craven County totaled $7.79 million through state sales and excise taxes, as well as income taxes. Local taxes generated from sales and property tax revenue from travel-generated and travel-supported businesses totaled $3.13 million..

 

WEDNESDAY: Travel matters to keeping America connected.

Within the next five years, Labor Day-like traffic will plague U.S. highways on a daily basis and within the next six years, our nation’s top 30 airports will experience Thanksgiving-like passenger volumes on a weekly basis.

Approximately 80 million inbound travelers visited America last year, about half of whom came from overseas. Spending by these visitors supports 1.2 million American jobs.

 

THURSDAY: Travel matters to health.

Americans are increasingly realizing the value of their vacation time, taking an average of 17.2 days of vacation each year. Yet less than half of that time is used to travel—despite its clear benefits for health.

Those who take all or most of their vacation time to travel report higher rates of happiness with physical health and well-being compared to those who don’t travel as much.

 

FRIDAY: Travel matters to hometown pride.

Over half of all leisure travel in the U.S. is to visit family and friends, making residents a community’s best tourism ambassador.

The intersection of sports—a key driver of hometown pride—and travel is unmistakable: in 2017, more than 150 million individuals attended sporting events last year across the five major sports teams.

 

SATURDAY: Travel matters to families.

Travel helps families connect, creating everlasting memories and develop a lifelong bond. When surveyed, most children (61%) say the best way to spend quality time with parents is on vacation. At their core, adults know this: 62 percent of adults say that their earliest, most vivid memories are of family vacations taken between the ages of five and 10.

Posted in Business, Community, Community issues, Downtown New Bern, Economy, Economy and Employment, Tourism

April 26th, 2019 by newbernpostadmin

The Craven County Board of Commissioners reversed its April 15 decision to decline renewal of the curbside recycling program in Craven County at its specially called meeting held on April 26.

The curbside recycling program in Craven County will continue, though residents will see modifications.  The Craven County Board of Commissioners voted to renew the curbside recycling contract with Waste Industries for the next five years to provide a monthly curbside pickup of recyclables in a 95-gallon rolling container.

The current curbside recycling program will continue as is until Craven County and Waste Industries are able to implement the program changes.  Residents will see a recycling fee increase on their annual tax bill and that fee will be determined during the Craven County Board of Commissioner’s annual budget process.  The fee is expected to be between $56 and $60 per household per year.  More details regarding the changes to Craven County’s curbside recycling program will be announced at a later date.

The Special Meeting of the Craven County Board of Commissioners was held in response to citizen demand for the continuation of curbside recycling services after the initial decision was communicated.

“The Board of Commissioners wants to be responsive.  I am so glad so many in the community support environmentally friendly policies,” E.T. Mitchell, Craven County Commissioner, said in a prepared statement.

Craven County’s curbside recycling program accepts aluminum cans, newspapers with inserts, clear/green/brown glass, #1 PETE clear plastic, #2 HDPE natural plastic, rigid plastic bottles with the neck smaller than the body of the container (except motor oil and pesticide containers), corrugated cardboard cut down to no larger than 2’ x 3’ and steel/tin cans.

Craven County offers a host of trash and recycling programs including electronics recycling, paint exchange and scrap metal recycling.  For additional information on Craven County’s trash and recycling services please contact Craven County Solid Waste and Recycling at 252-636-6659 or visit www.cravencountync.gov.

Posted in Community, Community issues, Craven County, Craven County Board of Commissioners, Environment

April 24th, 2019 by newbernpostadmin

Craven County commissioners will be reconsidering a short-sighted decision to end curbside recycling following backlash from citizens upset by the decision.

Commissioners made the decision on April 15 rather than double the fee due to cost increases.

This is one of those no-win situations for the board, a majority-Republican group with two newcomers (E.T. Mitchell and Denny Bucher) hesitant to raise taxes or fees because, well, they’re Republicans.

But here’s the thing: ending curbside recycling forces people to do one of three things: discard their recyclables with the regular garbage; make trips to county convenience centers to drop off their recyclables; or toss their recyclables into the woods or by the side of roads along with their other garbage because people like that suck.

For those of us who actually try to be law abiding and who care about the environment, throwing out recyclables with the regular garbage actually violates county rules that forbid recyclables from going into the landfill.

On top of that, citizens would be charged $3 for every 33 gallons of recyclables they illegally send to the landfill.

On top of that, the amount of materials going into the landfill would increase significantly, reducing the life of the landfill. You want to talk about spending taxpayer dollars? Try expanding landfills or opening new ones.

The good news is, commissioners are going to reconsider their decision.

The Board of Commissioners will hold a special called meeting Friday April 26 at 10:30 a.m. (I know! The time sucks!) in the Commissioners’ Board Room at the corner of Broad and Craven streets. The purpose of this meeting is to discuss the decision made by the board on April 15 concerning the curbside recycling contract.

So here’s the other side. If county commissioners vote to continue curbside recycling, they will be accused of increasing taxes and fees by the usual group of folks who can’t see past this evening’s episode of Hannity.

The reason recycling has become an issue is because China has stopped accepting U.S. recyclables. We as a nation do a terrible job of separating our recyclables and properly preparing them, and the Chinese have decided it’s not worth the effort and expense to process it.

I know this doesn’t apply to New Bern Post readers, who statistically are better educated about such things and care about the environment. But, sad to say, you are in the minority.

If you want to make sure county commissioners do the right thing and continue curbside recycling, show up at Friday’s meeting.

Posted in Commentary, Community, Community issues, Craven County, Craven County Board of Commissioners, Environment

April 23rd, 2019 by newbernpostadmin

A local couple is taking over The UPS Store franchise in New Bern from longtime franchisees Pat Drake and Mack Paul, who are retiring after nearly 25 years in business.

Jim and Middleton Hinckley of New Bern will take over management of the store around the end of April. An Open House will be held at the store at 1822 S. Glenburnie Road, New Bern, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, May 4, celebrating the new owners as well as the retirement of the previous owners.

The New Bern store has 1,200 square feet of floor space and employs three full-time and two part-time workers, in addition to the owners.

Jim and Middleton Hinckley discovered The UPS Store franchise was available while looking for opportunities to operate their own small business.

“UPS Stores are franchised with local ownership,” Jim Hinckley said. “It’s a great small business model and I think local ownership is a valuable business attribute.”

The UPS Store locations offer domestic and international shipping, packaging, printing, mailbox services, postal services, drop-off shredding, moving supplies and other small-business services.

Jim Middleton has been spending April preparing for the transition, including two weeks at a training store in Florence, S.C., and two weeks at the corporate headquarters in San Diego, Calif.

“Pat and Mack run a great business,” he said. “We have a great staff in the store so we are excited about that and look forward to getting to know them. The UPS Store offers a lot of services so we’ll be looking for opportunities to grow.” 

The Hinckleys have been in New Bern for seven years. They have three children, Brent age 13, Middy age 12, and Marshall age 8.

Jim Hinckley’s background is in car sales, while Middleton Hinckley has a Ph.D. in Biochemistry from the University of Notre Dame. She worked as a postdoctoral fellow at Duke University before starting a family.

“It’s a unique and wonderful town,” Middleton Hinckley said. “For us, The UPS Store is a great way to further our ties to New Bern and contribute to the community.” 

Pat Drake moved to New Bern in 1994 from Long Island, N.Y., and opened the New Bern Mail Boxes Etc. franchise in September 1994 (Mail Boxes Etc. became The UPS Store starting in 2002).

She met Mack Paul a month later as a customer. He was a journalist working for the Pamlico News. They married in 1997 and Paul started working at the store in October 1997.

Pat Drake and Mack Paul are known for excellent customer service as well as community service. They were recipients of a Community Fabric Award from the Craven Community College Foundation in 2016, are active in the Tryon Civitan Club, and have helped collect food and diapers for Religious Community Services and the Salvation Army.

With that in mind, they were not interested in selling their franchise to someone who would simply run the business.

“We didn’t want to sell to just anyone,” said Mack Paul. “We wanted someone who would continue our tradition of being active in the community—and they fit the bill.”

“Following Pat and Mack is somewhat daunting,” Middleton Hinckley said. “They not only run a great business, but they are also involved in the community in so many positive ways. We bump into their work and contributions in the area everywhere we turn. We plan to continue our own involvement in the New Bern community as well as many of the contributions Pat and Mack are making through The UPS Store.”

“Pat and Mack have earned their tremendous reputation in the community,” Paul Hinckley said. “Every single person I talk to comments on their tremendous customer service and philanthropy. Community involvement is near and dear to my heart, so I’m looking forward to the challenge of maintaining their example.”

Pat Drake and Mack Paul will remain in the area and continue to make repairs to their home, which was damaged by Hurricane Florence.

“Someone asked if I was quitting the Tryon Civitan Club,” Mack Paul said. “Why would I do that?”

“We’re not moving away. This is still home,” Pat Drake said.

Posted in Business, Community, Community Fabric Awards, Economy and Employment, New Bern

April 22nd, 2019 by newbernpostadmin

From prairie churches to urban cathedrals and synagogues, historic sacred places are often the oldest, and most beautiful buildings within our communities. Apply for a grant from the National Fund for Sacred Places to keep these places as an important part of our national cultural heritage.

The National Fund for Sacred Places is a comprehensive program that provides training, planning grants, and capital grants from $50,000 to $250,000 to congregations of all faiths for rehabilitation work on their historic facilities.

In the face of changing demographics and inadequate resources now is the time to support these structures that have played a critical role in shaping the character of our communities.

Congregations are urged to submit their letter of intent by May 1 for the Fund for Sacred Places for projects such as: 

  • Urgent repair needs that are integral to life safety.
  • Projects that improve the usability or ADA accessibility of the property.
  • Renovation projects for important community outreach.

To date 44 congregations have participated in the National Fund.  From Birmingham, Alabama to Unalaska, Alaska, more than $3.1 million in funding has been committed to projects that range from steeple stabilization to exterior masonry repair to HVAC replacement. Learn more about these diverse projects.

Visit www.FundforSacredPlaces.org for more details, including eligibility requirements, guidelines, and online application.

The National Fund for Sacred Places is a program of the National Trust for Historic Preservation in collaboration with Partners for Sacred Places.

Posted in Community, Community issues, Worship

April 17th, 2019 by newbernpostadmin

Join Earth Day celebrations on Saturday, April 20 from 1 – 4 p.m. at the corner of Craven and South Front Streets in the vacant lot next to Mitchell Hardware for fun afternoon of learning, children’s activities, giveaways, and an after party!

The goal is to bring people together for a fun, learning experience about our local ecosystem and discover how we can all become more socially-conscious.

“We want to start the conversation and spread awareness of how we can take steps to “Refuse, Rethink, Reduce, Reuse, and Recycle.'”

The event will kick off with the reading of the Mayoral Proclamation of Earth Day 2019 (officially recognized on April 22).

Meet organizations who are making a difference in the preservation and conservation of our local environment. Your children will have fun with eco-conscious activities hosted by the Boys and Girls Club of the Coastal Plains with materials sponsored by U. S. Cellular.

Continue the celebration with The After Party will be hosted by NCMZ.live and the Brown Pelican held from 4 – 7 p.m. at the Brown Pelican with live music by the Carolina Swamp Dogs and the Neuse River Ramblers.

New Bern Parks and Recreation is partnering with New Bern Now to present New Bern Earth Day 2019.

Educators:

  • Carolina Nature Coalition, 252-626-5100  
  • Coastal Environmental Partnership, 252-633-1564
  • Young Living Essential Oils by Dona Baker, 252-672-5933
  • New Bern Parks and Recreation, 252-639-2901
  • NC Sierra Club – Croatan Group
  • Trent Woods Garden Club, 252-288-4846
  • Veterans Employment Base Camp

You’ll also be given a map highlighting participating Downtown Businesses.

Enjoy giveaways both at the event and at participating businesses.

Participating Downtown Businesses:

  • Carolina Creations – Recycled Art Exhibit, 317-A Pollock St., 252-533-4369
  • Hanna House Bed & Breakfast – Beekeeping, Tesla Charging Station, and Water Reuse System Exhibits, 218 Pollock St., 252-635-3209
  • Living Well Down East – Healthy Living and Giveaways, 309 Middle St., 252-637-0011

Special thank you:

  • Volunteer Members of the Earth Day Planning Committee and Day of Volunteers.
  • Sponsors: Boys & Girls Club New Bern, U.S. Cellular, AlphaGraphics of New Bern, Harris Teeter, NCMZ.live, The Brown Pelican, Century 21 Zaytoun-Raines, Carolina Creations, New Bern Woman’s Club, Salon #9, The Sanctuary Gallery, and the aforementioned Exhibitors and Participating Businesses.

Posted in Community, Community issues, Entertainment, Environment, New Bern

April 5th, 2019 by newbernpostadmin

Heritage Homes Tour April 12 & 13

Celebrate New Bern’s heritage and resilience with the New Bern Historical Society’s Heritage Homes Tour April 12-13.

Traditional historic homes, restorations in progress, newly completed renovations, and beautiful gardens will all be on display, many for the very first time.  For two days visitors will be invited to tour 18 remarkable properties in five historic neighborhoods — Downtown, Dryborough, Riverside, Ghent, and DeGraffenried Park.

When you take a break at the Garden Party at the Heritage Homes Tour, you’ll be entertained by some of the area’s most popular musicians. Taking the Back Porch Stage at the Attmore-Oliver House from 11 a.m. – 3 p.m. on Friday and Saturday will be Simon Spalding, The Duzan Duo, The DownEast Dulcimers and Big Jim and Kathy Kohler. The New Bern Historical Society is planning an exciting two-day event and the addition of live music means an extra layer of fun, and all part of your ticket.  After a stop for refreshments and music at the Garden Party, you’ll be ready to continue your Tour.

Master Gardeners will present special Heritage Horticulture information, and guide visitors through three gardens, including the Historical Society’s Heritage Garden. Food trucks along the route will offer lunches to help guest maximize their tour schedules.

Tickets, good for both days, are available at New Bern Historical Society office at 511 Broad Street (252-638-8558) and on line atwww.NewBernHistorical.org/tickets. They are also available at outlets at Mitchell Hardware on Craven Street, the Bank of the Arts on Middle Street, Harris Teeter on MLK Blvd and in Carolina Colours. Tickets are $20 in advance and $25 the day of the tour, and $15 for active duty military, students, and those in groups of 10 or larger.

The New Bern Historical Society celebrates and promotes New Bern and its heritage through events and education.  Offices are located in the historic Attmore-Oliver House at 511 Broad Street in New Bern.  For more information, call 252-638-8558 or go www.NewBernHistorical.org orwww.facebook.com/NewBernHistoricalSociety.

 

Posted in Community, Events, History, New Bern Historical Society

April 4th, 2019 by newbernpostadmin

CHERRY POINT— Allies for Cherry Point’s Tomorrow (ACT) will host the 4th Annual Brews & Bites on Friday, May 3 from 5- 9 p.m. The event will be located on the Neuse River, at the end of Broad Street, and will feature the return of New Bern’s own internationally-acclaimed stunt pilot, Hubie Tolson.

Attendees will experience an evening on the river’s edge sampling wine, local craft brews from Brutopia and Shortway Brewing, and food from The Tiny Tornado and Dank Burrito. There will be live music from Glorianna’s Tom Gossin and an air show performance by Hubie Tolson.

Brews & Bites was created as a community event to raise awareness for ACT’s efforts to protect and grow MCAS Cherry Point—this area’s largest economic engine and the largest employer in Craven and Carteret counties. All proceeds will benefit continuing efforts to cement the successful future of the base, which includes the next-generation F-35B Joint Strike Fighter.

ACT President and Havelock Mayor Will Lewis, said, “We were extremely pleased with the success of last year’s event and the support shown for Cherry Point. This year, especially with a return performance from Hubie Tolson, we feel we can reach even more people in our community and spread the word about the vital impact the base has on our economy.”

Tickets for the event are $35 per person. Food is additional. To purchase tickets online, go to www.alliesforcherrypoint.com.

Allies for Cherry Point’s Tomorrow (ACT) advocates for the existence and success of Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, Fleet Readiness Center East and its civilian enterprises. Board members include leaders from Craven, Carteret, Pamlico, and Jones Counties who work closely with Congressional and legislative delegations to push for laws and budget appropriations that will help preserve and grow MCAS Cherry Point—a base crucial to the success of the U.S. military and the economy of the region. For more information, call (252) 631-5021 or visit www.alliesforcherrypoint.com.

Posted in Community, Community issues, Downtown New Bern, Entertainment, Events, Marines

March 30th, 2019 by newbernpostadmin

Dawn Zimmer / Wikipedia

Dawn Zimmer, former mayor of Hoboken, New Jersey, is giving a presentation on resiliency in New Bern on April 4.

A special meeting of the New Bern Board of Aldermen was called for 1 p.m. Thursday, April 4 in the City Hall Courtroom located on the second d floor, at 300 Pollock St., for the presentation.

According to Wikipedia, in 2012 Zimmer was widely acclaimed for leadership during the aftermath Hurricane Sandy. On Sept. 9, 2013, she was recognized as “Hero of the Harbor” by the Waterfront Alliance for her work “to make her city a national model for preparedness, meeting with FEMA and state officials, surban planners, scientists and many others to create an ‘integrated solution.'”

For her leadership during Hurricane Sandy, Zimmer was appointed to the President’s Hurricane Sandy Rebuilding Task Force.

More about Dawn Zimmer:

Posted in Board of Aldermen, Community, Community issues, Craven County, Hurricane

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