Category: Health

October 28th, 2019 by newbernpostadmin

New Bern, North Carolina, ranked above its small city peers in Eastern North Carolina, but not so well compared to other small cities in North Carolina or nationally in a new WalletHub report released today.

The study takes into account affordability, economic health, education and health, quality of life, and safety.

Using those measures, New Bern ranks ahead of every other small city straddling or east of Interstate 95, including its closest neighbors considered “small cities,” Greenville and Jacksonville. Smaller towns including Havelock and Kinston were not included in the study.

As for the rest of the state, New Bern falls in the middle of the pack, and in the nation, posted an unremarkable 29th percentile.

Source: WalletHub
Here is a chart of North Carolina small cities (apologies that the grid does not line up):

Percentile*

City

Total Score

‘Affordability’ Rank

‘Economic Health’ Rank

‘Education & Health’ Rank

‘Quality of Life’ Rank

‘Safety’ Rank

98

Holly Springs, NC

68.7

15

203

242

1052

72

98

Apex, NC

68.61

86

34

244

618

187

95

Wake Forest, NC

67.15

103

80

270

483

291

89

Huntersville, NC

65.48

76

129

531

637

299

85

Asheville, NC

64.42

983

215

619

4

1165

84

Matthews, NC

64.33

138

171

551

329

623

83

Chapel Hill, NC

64.19

869

266

581

63

473

80

Concord, NC

63.66

332

227

806

244

385

71

Mooresville, NC

62.18

380

192

707

137

877

54

Cornelius, NC

59.32

303

204

535

513

665

52

Kannapolis, NC

59.02

504

94

1026

899

662

50

Garner, NC

58.61

382

1093

353

629

820

36

Indian Trail, NC

56.56

96

379

509

1224

1072

33

Hickory, NC

55.97

666

633

1094

98

1123

29

New Bern, NC

55.15

923

870

1031

178

1009

21

Thomasville, NC

53.63

585

774

1093

1019

1075

18

Burlington, NC

53.11

793

888

1058

409

1082

16

Jacksonville, NC

52.6

1128

1057

839

251

944

15

Monroe, NC

52.31

821

854

808

578

1191

12

Greenville, NC

51.71

1075

1146

969

145

1087

11

Asheboro, NC

51.3

806

756

1134

544

1148

8

Sanford, NC

50.08

679

891

1118

515

1224

5

Salisbury, NC

48.66

959

879

1148

363

1234

5

Rocky Mount, NC

48.58

852

1129

1200

640

1158

4

Gastonia, NC

48.39

826

707

1161

635

1237

4

Wilson, NC

48.12

828

1102

1167

592

1208

2

Goldsboro, NC

46.5

1037

1177

1154

316

1236

 

Go here for the rest of the story.

Posted in Economy, Economy and Employment, Health, Public safety

August 5th, 2019 by newbernpostadmin

Source: WalletHub

North Carolina ranks second to last for access to medical care, according to a study by WalletHub.

According to the CDC, 87.6 percent of the nation’s population has a regular place to go for medical care. But the cost and service quality of that care can vary widely from state to state. The overall health of the population, more advanced medical equipment and a general lack of awareness regarding the best types of treatment, for instance, can all affect costs. Today, the average American spends more than $10,000 per year on personal health care, according to the most recent estimates from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. That’s about 17.9 percent of the U.S. GDP.

But higher costs don’t necessarily translate to better results. According to a study by the Kaiser Family Foundation, the U.S. lags behind several other wealthy nations on several measures, such as health coverage, life expectancy and disease burden, which measures longevity and quality of life. However, the U.S. has improved in giving more healthcare access for people in worse health, and healthcare cost growth has slowed somewhat.

Conditions aren’t uniform across the U.S., though. To determine where Americans receive the best and worst health care, WalletHub compared the 50 states and the District of Columbia across 43 measures of cost, accessibility and outcome. Read on for our findings, expert insight on the future of American health care and a full description of our methodology.

North Carolina? It ranked 50th, ahead of only Alaska.

Virginia, the highest-ranked Southern state, ranked 21st. South Carolina ranked 48th.

Here is the breakdown:

States with Best Health Care Systems

Overall Rank
(1 = Best)
State Total Score ‘Cost’ Rank ‘Access’ Rank ‘Outcomes’ Rank
1 Minnesota 63.79 2 4 9
2 Massachusetts 62.33 35 2 1
3 Rhode Island 62.12 11 5 6
4 District of Columbia 61.38 1 3 26
5 Vermont 60.13 5 34 4
6 New Hampshire 59.80 40 8 2
7 Hawaii 59.64 8 36 5
8 Maine 58.44 38 1 13
9 North Dakota 58.21 3 9 22
10 Iowa 57.27 15 17 14
11 Colorado 56.77 47 12 3
12 Maryland 56.71 4 21 23
13 Connecticut 56.44 44 11 7
14 Kansas 56.05 7 16 27
15 Pennsylvania 55.70 13 13 25
16 Wisconsin 55.46 45 6 10
17 Montana 55.44 21 19 18
18 South Dakota 55.15 17 15 24
19 Utah 55.12 32 41 8
20 Michigan 55.09 6 18 30
21 Virginia 54.63 25 35 12
22 Nebraska 53.64 43 10 17
23 New Jersey 53.39 14 30 28
24 New York 52.26 29 24 29
25 Ohio 52.22 10 22 37
26 Illinois 52.20 24 23 32
27 Wyoming 52.14 36 37 16
28 Idaho 52.02 30 43 19
29 Delaware 51.79 42 27 21
30 California 51.19 39 42 20
31 New Mexico 50.95 19 31 36
32 Washington 49.85 48 44 11
33 Oregon 49.43 49 29 15
34 Indiana 49.29 9 38 40
35 Kentucky 49.11 16 14 47
36 Tennessee 48.05 18 32 42
37 Missouri 47.50 31 25 41
38 Nevada 47.37 22 47 39
39 Florida 47.37 34 46 35
40 West Virginia 47.35 41 7 45
41 Arizona 46.74 37 48 34
42 Alabama 46.59 12 45 46
43 Texas 45.94 28 51 38
44 Louisiana 44.50 33 20 49
45 Oklahoma 44.47 26 39 48
46 Georgia 44.45 23 49 44
47 Arkansas 43.48 20 33 50
48 South Carolina 42.96 46 40 43
49 Mississippi 42.76 27 28 51
50 North Carolina 42.63 50 50 33
51 Alaska 42.21 51 26 31

Posted in Health, State news

June 26th, 2019 by newbernpostadmin

Analysis provides a county-by-county update to 2014 data as North Carolina considers Medicaid expansion

Expanding Medicaid would create more than 37,000 new jobs and insure approximately 365,000 more people, according to a new non-partisan analysis. The report was prepared by researchers at The George Washington University with funding from Cone Health Foundation and the Kate B. Reynolds Charitable Trust.

Craven County alone would experience 169 new jobs and 5,720 more people covered by Medicaid by 2022. The county’s economy would grow by $35.5 million, and county tax revenues would increase by $390,000.

In addition to the new jobs created and the hundreds of thousands of uninsured residents gaining coverage, the researchers estimate that the state would increase its business activity by $11.7 billion in just three years, between 2020-2022. It’s money that could be spent on education, infrastructure and other needs.

“Medicaid expansion is a job creator and can extend health coverage to thousands of previously uninsured North Carolinians who are falling through the gaps in our current system,” said Susan Shumaker, president, Cone Health Foundation. “States that have already expanded Medicaid are better equipped to tackle critical health care concerns like opioid addiction and infant mortality rates, issues that need to be addressed here at home in North Carolina.”

The analysis updates a 2014 report, providing a county-by-county look at the number of jobs, new Medicaid enrollees and economic growth that would result from the state expanding Medicaid. With nearly one in six non-elderly adults in North Carolina uninsured (16%)—a rate that is above the national average (12%)—every county, urban or rural, stands to benefit. For example, both an urban county like Wake and a rural county like Burke will create jobs under Medicaid expansion, 4,076 and 456, respectively.

“This report confirms what we’re hearing from families across the state—increased access to quality health care and economic opportunities helps communities thrive, and research shows that expanding Medicaid delivers both,” said Laura Gerald, MD, president, Kate B. Reynolds Charitable Trust. “Every community stands to benefit fromMedicaid expansion. The evidence shows that closing the Medicaid gap will improve population health, support vulnerable North Carolina families and boost the economy across the major sectors.”

North Carolina remains just one of 14 states yet to expand Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act, and according to experts at The George Washington University, Medicaid eligibility requirements in North Carolina are the ninth most restrictive in the country. As a result, nearly 1 million North Carolinians between the ages of 19 and 64 are uninsured.

Posted in Economy and Employment, Health

March 22nd, 2019 by newbernpostadmin

A free annual event, Carnival of Colors, will be Saturday, March 30, from noon to 2 p.m. at the North Carolina History Center, 529 S. Front Street, New Bern. The event celebrates cancer patients, survivors and legacies.

The event includes New Bern Get Your Color On Board members, Cancer Resource Groups including CarolinaEast Hospital and CCHC, Local Business Sponsors, Music provided by Strung Together, Live Painting by local Artist Sarah Brumbaugh, event guests and more.

New Bern Get Your Color On (NBGYCO) is a community organization that strives to promote awareness and education as well as support hose affected by all types of cancer. Proceeds from our efforts are used to provide care and comfort to cancer patients within our community.

Posted in Community, Community issues, Events, Health

February 21st, 2019 by newbernpostadmin

Craven Community College’s (Craven CC) Adult Enrichment Program (AEP) will host a symposium entitled “Stop the Cravin’!” in an effort to promote substance abuse education, prevention and intervention.

This free event will take place at Orringer Hall on the New Bern Campus from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Thursday, March 14.

The event will feature a diverse panel of speakers from local health care providers, local and state law enforcement and community-based organizations. It will provide statistics for the area, health effects and the science behind the many aspects of addiction, case studies and firsthand accounts from those in the medical field. There will also be perspectives shared by former addicts, an emergency room charge nurse and local law enforcement.

Professional panelists include Kenneth W. Wilkins, Jr., MD, FACP, endoscopist and president of Coastal Carolina Health Care, PA; Matt Knight of the NC Task Force for Safe Schools and NC Alcohol Law Enforcement (ALE) branch; Henry D. Beckwith, PsyD, a licensed psychologist; and Nadine Williamson, a certified substance abuse counselor.

Those in attendance will have the opportunity to: participate in a Q&A, learn how to recognize the signs and symptoms of opioid and related substance abuse issues, how to intervene and prevent future addictions. Equipping people with knowledge so they know what to do in such situations can ensure that loved ones don’t become just another statistic.

“Our goal is to raise awareness of the substance abuse epidemic that is steadily increasing and affecting our community and communities throughout the country, and in turn aid in the prevention of their use,” said Megan Johnson, AEP coordinator. “It is our hope that this symposium will be of great benefit to those who have been touched by this crisis and who are impacted in their daily personal and professional lives.”

Preregistration is not required and CEUs are available for eligible professionals. Doors open at 7:45 a.m.

This event is sponsored by Craven Community College, the CCHC Foundation, the Harold H. Bate Foundation, ABC of Craven County, Coastal Coalition and Trillium Health Resources.

For more information, contact Johnson at 252-638-7273 or johnsonm@cravencc.edu.

Posted in Community, Community issues, Craven Community College, Health, New Bern, Public safety

January 28th, 2019 by newbernpostadmin

Sarah, a New Bern resident, has lost 100 pounds. She can help you reach your weight goal, too.

Whether you’re carrying a few extra pounds after the holidays, or if your New Year’s resolution is to shed some unwanted weight, we can help. Just ask New Bern resident Sarah — she’s lost 100 pounds using this plan.

Send us an email to learn how Sarah did it. She’s happy to share her recipes and diet plan. Or go here if you want to start right away. It’s a great way to kick off the new year. Money back guarantee.

Posted in Health

October 11th, 2018 by newbernpostadmin

Valley Fine Foods, a Forest City, N.C. establishment, is recalling approximately 35,516 pounds of heat-treated, not fully cooked meat and poultry products that may be adulterated due to presence of spoilage organisms that have rendered it unwholesome and unfit for human food, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.

The heat-treated, not fully cooked, refrigerated meat and poultry products were produced on various dates from Aug. 15, 2018 through Oct. 4, 2018. The following products are subject to recall:

• 12-oz. tray packages containing “SIMPLE DISHES™ Chicken Penne Alfredo” with case code #19034, case UPC code 1-07-42753-34709-0, and “BEST IF USED BY” “10/09/18” through “11/25/18”. Unit UPC 7-42753-34709-3.

• 12-oz.  tray packages containing “SIMPLE DISHES™ Chicken Primavera” with case code #19033, case UPC code 1-07-42753-34708-3, and “BEST IF USED BY” “10/09/18” through “11/25/18”. Unit UPC 7-42753-34708-6.

• 12-oz. tray packages containing “SIMPLE DISHES™ Italian Sausage Ziti” with case code #19035, case UPC code 1-07-42753-34711-3, and “BEST IF USED BY” “10/09/18” through “11/25/18”. Unit UPC 7-42753-34711-6.

• 12-oz.  tray packages containing “SIMPLE DISHES™ Rigatoni with Meatballs and a Mushroom Cream Sauce” with case code #19036, case UPC Code of 1-07-42753- 34710-6 and “BEST IF USED BY” “10/09/18” through “11/25/18”.  Unit UPC 7-42753-34710-9.

The products subject to recall bear the establishment number “ P-22102B” or “M-22102B” on the side of the product package. These items were shipped retail locations in California, Connecticut, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan and North Carolina.

The problem was discovered on Oct. 4, 2018 by the establishment’s research and development department during routine internal testing. FSIS was notified on Oct. 10, 2018.

There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about an injury or illness should contact a healthcare provider.

FSIS is concerned that some product may be in consumer’s refrigerators or freezers. Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.

FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify recalling firms notify their customers of the recall and that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers.

Media and consumers with questions regarding the recall can contact Valley Fine Foods customer service line, at 844-833-6888.

Consumers with food safety questions can “Ask Karen,” the FSIS virtual representative available 24 hours a day at AskKaren.gov or via smartphone at m.askkaren.gov. The toll-free USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline 888-MPHotline (888-674-6854) is available in English and Spanish and can be reached from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday. Recorded food safety messages are available 24 hours a day. The online Electronic Consumer Complaint Monitoring System can be accessed 24 hours a day at: http://www.fsis.usda.gov/reportproblem.

Posted in Food, Health, New Bern

October 8th, 2018 by newbernpostadmin

George Alsberg, age 103, of Wilmington, was one of the oldest voluntary evacuees of Hurricane Florence. Photo credit: Taylor Knopf

NORTH CAROLINA HEALTH NEWS | 

That’s the takeaway from a state-compiled list of the adults who died as a result of the catastrophic storm. It shows that two out of three North Carolinians who died during or as a result of Florence were 60 or older, and nearly half were 70 or older. The median age of adults who died during or as a result of the storm was 67, while the statewide median age is 38.3.

“Vulnerable adults are more likely to be impacted because of their social isolation, or not having the supports they needed in areas like transportation,” said Heather Burkhardt, program coordinator at Resources for Seniors in Raleigh.

The list of deaths tied to the catastrophic September storm grew to 39 on Oct. 1, when Gov. Roy Cooper announced two deaths, one of a Pender County man, 69, who fell off a roof Sept. 22 while repairing storm damage. A list supplied by the Department of Public Safety showed that people older than 65 represented:

  • Six of 11 people who drowned in motor vehicle accidents,
  • Five of six people who died of medical causes such as cardiopulmonary distress or COPD
  • Three of five who died doing cleanup and
  • A couple, 86, who died in a fire caused by the use of candles while power was out.

Three of the victims were infants and two others did not have listed ages. Of the 34 adult deaths with ages attached, 21 were older than 65.

Perhaps the most poignant death was that of a man, 82, who committed suicide in Carteret County after Florence devastated his home. “Shot self when house condemned,” read the terse DPS account of the death.

More

 

 

Posted in Community issues, Economy, Economy and Employment, Environment, FEMA, Health, Hurricane, State news, State politics

October 8th, 2018 by newbernpostadmin

LONGLEAF POLITICS | Hurricane Matthew struck eastern North Carolina on Oct. 9, 2016.

A full 18 months later, some of the first federally funded repairs are slated to begin this June.

Hurricane Matthew has re-emerged as a political issue in Raleigh as thousands of people in eastern North Carolina await public money to rebuild.

The storm was one of the most devastating in North Carolina’s history, killing 31 people and caused more than $4.8 billion in damage. Matthew set rainfall records in 17 counties, and 2,300 people were rescued from floodwaters.

Why is recovery taking so long?

It mostly has to do with the processes set up to distribute the roughly $1.7 billion in recovery aid expected from the federal and state government.

While the initial response from the N.C. National Guard and FEMA came quickly, North Carolina has been in no hurry to distribute money intended for longer-term recovery.

And as it turns out, there’s a huge difference between money that’s been approved — and money that’s actually been used.

The breakdown of funding sources is an alphabet soup of agencies, each with its own policies and mechanisms and hoops to jump through. State governments have incentives to get roads repaired quickly. Homes, not so much.

Here’s a quick explanation of how disaster recovery works. It’s ordered by how quickly money has been distributed.

More

Posted in Economy, Economy and Employment, Environment, FEMA, Health, Housing, Hurricane, Infrastructure, Longleaf Politics, State news, State politics, Weather

October 1st, 2018 by newbernpostadmin

Though Florence has come and gone, people affected by the hurricane are still cleaning up and rebuilding. Those in affected areas with asthma and allergies must be extra careful during this time. There are many things to consider as they remove debris, clean up flood damage and make repairs.

Long after waters have receded, flood waters can leave behind chemicals, bacteria, viruses and mold. These can create long-term health issues if you have asthma and allergies.

Mold is one of the biggest concerns after a flood. Mold, a fungus, can grow in any damp environment. It is different from plants or animals in how it reproduces and grows. The “seeds,” called spores, travel through the air. Mold spores get into your nose and cause allergy symptoms. They also can reach your lungs and trigger asthma.

Here are some precautions to consider during the recovery process:

  • Mold grows quickly after flooding. As you remove flood damage, wear a mask with a particulate respirator. Look for NIOSH and N95 or P100 printed on the mask. It should have two straps and should cover your nose and chin.
  • Also wear a mask as you clean up debris. Many neighborhoods are still lined with debris from downed trees and damaged homes. These piles can harbor mold, pollen and toxic chemicals as you wait for your county or city to pick them up.
  • Don’t burn debris. Smoke and toxic materials can irritate your airways. If neighbors burn their debris, shield yourself from the smoke as much as possible.
  • Consider hiring a professional to do the cleanup.
  • Throw out furniture and other items that cannot be cleaned immediately.
  • If possible, find another place to stay until the mold has been cleaned up.

If your home has been flooded or has water damage, mold may start growing in places you don’t expect. It does not go away as the water dries. Mold may grow inside furniture or under carpet that got wet, making it hard to find. If not replaced, it can make you and your family very sick. Items that have gotten wet from a flood have to be thoroughly cleaned and dried or discarded. Many allergens and asthma triggers can stick around long after a hurricane has passed. Keep these tips in mind in the coming months as you rebuild. For more information, visit http://www.aafa.org/mold-allergy/.

Posted in Health, Hurricane, New Bern

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