Category: Health

July 6th, 2020 by newbernpostadmin

Craven County passed a grim milestone on Monday, and now has the second highest COVID-19 case count in the eight-county Eastern North Carolina region.

Pitt County leads the region, with Lenoir now falling in at third.

The North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services reported 402 cases for Craven County as of Monday morning.

The Craven County Health Department reporter 392 cases on its website. The county count often lags behind the state’s count.

Of the 392 COVID-19 cases reported by the county as of Monday morning, 303 of those individuals have recovered, are doing well, and are out of isolation.

The recovered cases completed the necessary isolation requirement and have been free of COVID-19 symptoms for at least 72 hours.

Of the 392 cases, nine have been related to out of state travel, 82 are from community transmission, 295 are a direct contact with a previously confirmed positive case, and six are unknown and still being investigated.

There have been six deaths related to COVID-19. One of the active COVID-19 cases is currently hospitalized.

Of the newest cases, one additional case was confirmed in the afternoon on July 3, 2020, nine on July 4, 2020, three on July 5, 2020, and one Monday.

Posted in Health

July 6th, 2020 by newbernpostadmin

Effective Monday, July 6, CarolinaEast Health System is expanding limited visitation at CarolinaEast Medical Center and the Outpatient Surgery Center.

CarolinaEast leadership has developed a plan to incrementally increase visitation with patient, visitor and staff safety remaining the highest priority.

In late March, CarolinaEast postponed elective surgeries and restricted all visitation upon the recommendations of state and federal officials to help prevent the spread of COVID-19 and allow for unknowns related to the novel illness. As the situation has evolved, it has been determined that easing visitor restrictions is appropriate at this time. With some exceptions, patients will be allowed one designated visitor during limited visiting hours.

Limited visitation details implemented today, Monday, July 6, 2020:

• Visiting hours for inpatient units are 10:00am until 6:30pm for all units except Intensive Care Unit (ICU), which is 2:00pm until 6:00pm.
• Emergency Department patients will be allowed one companion.
• No visitation is allowed for patients on isolation protocol of any kind.
• All visitors must be at least 18 years old.
• All visitors must pass wellness screening upon entry into a CarolinaEast facility.
• All visitors will be required to obtain a visitor pass upon check-in, and check out after visiting.
• All visitors must remain in the patient’s room and wear a mask at all times.
• Due to social distancing guidelines, hospital waiting areas will not be open and visitors will be required to wait outside the facility during surgical procedures.

CarolinaEast appreciates everyone’s cooperation, patience and understanding during these extraordinary times.

“We have been anxious to increase visitation for some time, and although necessary, we know how difficult this limitation has been for our patients and their loved ones,” said Jim Davis, Chief Nursing Officer at CarolinaEast. “We also know that family support is an important piece of healing and we are so glad to finally be able to give that back to our patients.”

As the situation continues to evolve, CarolinaEast will advise of additional changes to the visitation policy. Visit www.carolinaeasthealth.com to learn more about CarolinaEast’s efforts to protect its patients, visitors and staff from COVID-19.

Posted in CarolinaEast, Health

July 2nd, 2020 by newbernpostadmin

He was standing in a near empty parking lot. She was standing in isolation at CarolinaEast Medical Center. Only a pane of glass separated them on their 25th anniversary.

From CarolinaEast Medical Center: This sweet patient, Cynthia Williams, was made to feel quite special by her husband and CarolinaEast staff. Mr. and Mrs. Williams celebrated their 25th wedding anniversary this week and although they weren’t able to be together the way they’d hoped, Mr. Williams found a unique way to celebrate their marriage with flowers and a “visit” through a window at CarolinaEast. Mrs. Williams appreciated seeing her love, even in this unconventional way. Happy 25th Anniversary to the Williams!

Posted in CarolinaEast, Health, New Bern

July 1st, 2020 by newbernpostadmin

Some bad news and some good news.

Once Craven County got past a supercluster of family, friends, and co-workers that originated in Lenoir County, it settled back into a relentlessly consistent rate of increase about five times greater than it was before the cluster emerged. (That’s the bad news.)

On the other hand, the number of recovered cases is outpacing the number of new cases, the number of hospitalizations has remained steady, and the number of deaths has decreased from four in April, to one each in May and June.

The last statistical update from New Bern Post was June 22, due to a staff shortage caused by day-job requirements. Between June 22 and July 1, there were 50 new cases reported in Craven County, an average of five cases per day.

At present rates, Craven County is about to overtake Lenoir County in the number of cases, but not in cases per capita, which Lenoir leads among the eight-county region in and around Craven County.

 

Because it has been awhile since the last New Bern Post update, here are some other data-graphics for your information:

 

Posted in Craven County, ENC Region, Health

June 26th, 2020 by newbernpostadmin

The North Carolina Retail Merchants Association (NCRMA) issued the following statement from Andy Ellen, president and general counsel, regarding Executive Order 147 issued by Governor Roy Cooper and the face covering requirement included.

“The main concern for all retailers has and continues to be the health and safety of their employees and their customers. At 5:00 pm today, Governor Roy Cooper’s Executive Order requires customers to wear a face covering while in a retail establishment or restaurant.

Since the onset of the COVID-19, retailers have made wide-ranging changes in their operations with safety in mind. They have incorporated social distancing procedures and worked tirelessly to keep stores open, shelves stocked, and carts sanitized. Many have shortened hours to institute stringent cleaning processes. Additionally, there are many stores that were closed for weeks and are struggling to recover from the shutdown and they are anxiously awaiting customers to return to shop. These businesses need your help both economically and with compliance with the face covering requirement. These businesses simply cannot afford a civil penalty or a criminal penalty because of customers not abiding by Governor Cooper’s Order.

We ask you to be patient with retailers and their employees as you go out to shop in the coming days and weeks, as they continue to navigate these unprecedented challenges. Please wear a mask or face covering and be considerate if you are asked to do so when you are shopping. Also, we can’t all know the reason another customer isn’t wearing a mask, such as due to a health condition, so be kind to each other.”

Posted in Health, State news

June 24th, 2020 by newbernpostadmin

Governor Roy Cooper and North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services Secretary Dr. Mandy Cohen today announced that North Carolina will remain in Safer at Home Phase 2 for three more weeks. Cooper also announced that face coverings must be worn when people are in public places as officials seek to stabilize concerning trends of increasing viral spread.

Cooper and Cohen were joined by Dennis Taylor, President of the North Carolina Nurses Association and Eugene A. Woods, President and CEO of Atrium Health.

“North Carolina is relying on the data and the science to lift restrictions responsibly, and right now our increasing numbers show we need to hit the pause button while we work to stabilize our trends,” said Governor Cooper. “We need to all work together so we can protect our families and neighbors, restore our economy, and get people back to work and our children back to school.”

“I know North Carolinians are strong, resilient and care deeply about our communities. We pride ourselves on helping our neighbors. The best way we can do that now is by taking the simple action of wearing a face covering that covers your nose and mouth. If we each do our part, we can get back to the people and places we love,” said Dr. Mandy Cohen, NCDHHS Secretary.

Growing evidence shows that cloth face coverings, when worn consistently, can decrease the spread of COVID-19, especially among people who are not yet showing symptoms of the virus. Until now, face coverings had been strongly recommended. Under today’s executive order, people must wear face coverings when in public places where physical distancing is not possible.

In addition, certain businesses must have employees and customers wear face coverings, including retail businesses, restaurants, personal care and grooming; employees of child care centers and camps; state government agencies under the Governor’s Cabinet; workers and riders of transportation; and workers in construction/trades, manufacturing, agriculture, meat processing and healthcare and long-term care settings.

“Wearing a face covering is an easy thing to do that can make a huge impact for all of us. A major spike in cases would be catastrophic to the system, and without your cooperation, nurses and our fellow healthcare providers will have a harder time caring for sick patients for weeks and months to come,” said Dennis Taylor, a nurse, and President of the North Carolina Nurses Association.

“As the leader of the state’s largest health system, I am pro-health and also 100 percent pro-business. In fact, the two are inextricably connected and I’m very proud of the way business leaders and health experts are working together to keep our economy strong,” said Eugene A. Woods, President and CEO of Atrium Health. “Medical science says to reduce the spread of COVID-19 masking works, and my sincere hope is that all the people of North Carolina can join forces to make wearing a mask not something we feel we have to do – but something that we want to do to keep each other, our neighbors, our children and our loved ones healthy and safe”

Based on the metrics laid out in April by Governor Cooper and Secretary Cohen, North Carolina is evaluating a combination of the data from the following categories that shows the indicators moving in the wrong direction, causing officials to implement today’s pause in Phase 2.

Trajectory in COVID-Like Illness (CLI) Surveillance Over 14 Days

  • North Carolina’s syndromic surveillance trend for COVID-like illness is increasing.

Trajectory of Lab-Confirmed Cases Over 14 Days

  • North Carolina’s trajectory of lab-confirmed cases starting to level, but is still increasing.

Trajectory in Percent of Tests Returning Positive Over 14 Days

  • North Carolina’s trajectory in percent of tests returning positive remains elevated.

Trajectory in Hospitalizations Over 14 Days

  • North Carolina’s trajectory of hospitalizations are increasing, though we have capacity in our healthcare system.

In addition to these metrics, the state continues building capacity to be able to adequately respond to an increase in virus spread. These areas include:

Laboratory Testing

  • North Carolina is averaging more than 17,000 tests a day for the past week and there are more than 500 sites listed on online plus additional pop-up sites.
  • North Carolina labs and labs around the country are seeing supply shortages for laboratory chemicals needed to process tests.

Tracing Capability

  • There are over 1,500 full-time and part-time staff supporting contact tracing efforts at the local health department level, including the 309 Carolina Community Tracing Collaborative contact tracers. These new hires reflect the diversity of the communities they serve, and 44% are bilingual.

Personal Protective Equipment

  • Our personal protective equipment (PPE) supplies are stable.

Businesses can download templates for signs on face coverings here. Downloadable social media graphics are also available for use.

Read Executive Order No. 147 that implements today’s announcement.

Read Frequently Asked Questions about today’s executive Order and mandatory face coverings.

Read NCDHHS guidance on face coverings.

View the slide presentation from today’s briefing.

By Ford Porter, NC Governor Roy Cooper’s Office

Posted in Craven County, Health, New Bern, State news, State politics

June 22nd, 2020 by newbernpostadmin

After a disturbingly high one-day total of 19 cases reported on Friday, another 13 laboratory-confirmed cases were confirmed in Craven County over a three-day period.

Craven County has 315 confirmed COVID-19 cases as of 11:30 a.m. on June 22, 2020.

Of the 315 cases, eight have been related to out of state travel, 47 are from community transmission, 253 are a direct contact with a previously confirmed positive case, and seven are unknown at this time.

Of the newest cases, two were confirmed on June 20, 2020, six on June 21, 2020, and four on June 22.

By ZIP Code and between June 7-22, 37 of the most recent cases have been in the 28562 area of New Bern, 19 in the 28560 area of New Bern, 17 in the 28586 area of Vanceboro, and 11 in the 28532 area of Havelock.

Out of the 315 confirmed positive cases, 192 of those individuals have recovered, are doing well, and are out of isolation. The recovered cases completed the necessary isolation requirement and have been free of COVID-19 symptoms for at least 72 hours.   There have been six deaths related to COVID-19. Five of the active COVID-19 cases are currently hospitalized.

Total Confirmed Cases Craven County

Active Cases

Craven County

Recovered 

Craven County

Deaths

Craven County

Currently Hospitalized 

Craven County 

*of active cases

315

117

192

6

5

 

 

Posted in Craven County, Health

June 20th, 2020 by newbernpostadmin

Craven County added 19 lab-confirmed cases of COVID-19 between Thursday and Friday afternoon, and one additional death.

The death, the sixth in Craven County due to the disease, was of a resident who died from complications related to COVID-19 on June 19, 2020.  The individual had several underlying health conditions. The death was reported to the Craven County Health Department on June 19, 2020. To protect the family’s privacy, no further information about the individual will be released.

The new cases bring Craven County’s total to 302 confirmed as of 4 p.m. on June 19, 2020 Friday.

Craven County has been seeing about seven new cases per day on average since May 8, at least partly coincidentally at the same time Phase 1 started relaxing rules to prevent the uncontrolled spread of the disease.

Of the newest cases, 12 of those are due to direct contact with a previously confirmed positive case.

Out of the 302 confirmed positive cases,Of the 302 cases, eight have been related to out of state travel, 46 are from community transmission, 244 are a direct contact with a previously confirmed positive case, and four are unknown at this time.

In this county, 192 of those individuals who were sickened have recovered, are doing well, and are out of isolation. The recovered cases completed the necessary isolation requirement and have been free of COVID-19 symptoms for at least 72 hours.

Five of the active COVID-19 cases are currently hospitalized.

 

Total Confirmed Cases Craven County

Active Cases

Craven County

Recovered 

Craven County

Deaths

Craven County

Currently Hospitalized 

Craven County

302

104

192

6

5

 

In the eight-county Eastern North Carolina region in and around Craven County, 57  new cases were reported over the past day ending Friday, with Pitt and Craven commanding the largest increases, and the rest spread among most of the rest of the counties.

Posted in Craven County, Health, New Bern

June 18th, 2020 by newbernpostadmin

The eight-county region in and around Craven County has seen an increase of three deaths and 246 lab-confirmed cases over the past week.

Craven County, meanwhile, has recovered from the spike in cases caused by a cluster that first started appearing in mid-May that added more than 150 cases. The cluster included family, friends, and co-workers and was apparently ignited at a food processing plant in Lenoir County.

That’s the good news. Not so good news is the fact that the pace of new cases in the county is accelerating at more than twice the pace than was experienced before the cluster.

On top of that, the pace appears to be increasing for community transmissions — cases for which the source is unknown.

That slight uptick, visible as the gold line on the graphic below, could be attributed to softening of restrictions under Phase 1 on May 8 and Phase 2 on May 22.

With new cases, hospitalizations, and deaths continuing to rise statewide, North Carolina won’t move to Phase 3 on Friday, which had been the earliest projected start date to return the state to more normal operations.

As long as people continue to conduct their lives as if there was no pandemic, the numbers will continue to rise.

Posted in Craven County, Health

June 11th, 2020 by newbernpostadmin

After a three-day relative lull in new COVID-19 cases, Craven County saw eight new laboratory-confirmed cases over the past 24 hours.

Craven County now has 249 confirmed COVID-19 cases as of 11 a.m. on June 11, 2020, according to the Craven County Health Department.

Of the 249 cases, eight have been related to out of state travel, 34 are from community transmission, 204 are a direct contact with a previously confirmed positive case, and three are unknown at this time.

Craven County is starting to see an increased number of “direct contact” cases related to “community transmission” cases reported since Phase 1 and Phase 2 relaxation of prevention measures were put in place.

Statewide, North Carolina has seen a surge in new cases, and some experts are saying it could be the “second wave” that worried epidemiologists but which was expected in the fall, not late spring.

Out of the 249 confirmed positive cases, 177 of those individuals have recovered, are doing well, and are out of isolation. The recovered cases completed the necessary isolation requirement and have been free of COVID-19 symptoms for at least 72 hours.

There have been five deaths related to COVID-19. Seven of the active COVID-19 cases are currently hospitalized.

Region

In the eight-county region in and around Craven County, there have been 55 new, lab-confirmed cases as well as one death. The region, like the state, has been trending upward post Phase 1 and 2, with hospitalizations and deaths — key indicators of the pandemic that can’t be blamed on numerous testing — also rising.

Posted in Craven County, Health

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