Category: Public safety

June 18th, 2020 by newbernpostadmin

In December 2012, An officer from City of New Bern, NC Police Department pulled a gun out on me, I was 13 years old, walking to the post office to mail a Christmas present, if I was Black I would probably be dead.

2012 was the year that New Bern Chief of Police Toussaint E. Summers Jr assumed his position as Chief of Police.

Over the past 8 years it has become increasingly evident that under Mr. Summers Leadership that The New Bern Police Department has operated in a culture that is at best disorganized, and at worst, a calculated effort of community intimidation.

In 2015 Mr. Summers along with a Captain and Two Lieutenants rushed to a local media outlet in an attempt to intimidate a Journalist for reporting in a way that Mr. Summers did not like. (PS. This particular situation has to do with reports of human trafficking.)

At a peaceful protest just last week in New Bern, The New Bern Police Department deployed a multitude of undercover police, something that many, including myself, view to be a complete and absolute waste of taxpayer money.

Now this week Officer Nick Rhodes with The New Bern Police Department made a public post stating that the shooting of #RayshardBrooks was justified, even after The Atlanta Police Department itself found that action to be so despicable that the officer that shot Rayshard Brooks was fired and has been charged with murder.

Furthermore The Chief, Members of The Governing Board, and The City manager have been notified of this statement by Officer Nick Rhodes and have yet to make a statement or take appropriate action.

In fact The City of New Bern leadership itself has taken no adequate action, and made no adequate statement to address the obvious racial inequities across North Carolina and The United States that have led to our current Civil Rights Movement.

What I have stated above are just a small snippet of the culture of intimidation and fear perpetuated by The New Bern Police Department, and so just like in the 1990s it would behoove the citizens of New Bern to possibly have an SBI investigation opened into The New Bern Police department to evaluate their practices and culture.

Nick Rhodes should resign by the end of the day.

I would also like to See Dana Outlaw, Mayor of New Bern call for a special session of The Board of Alderman, for the public to come and comment on their experiences with The New Bern Police Department.

Finally it is clear that Chief Summers does not hold the trust of the community and if he cannot take appropriate action to handle this moment, and allow for an investigation into his department, in a transparent manner, should resign himself. #NoJusticeNoPeace
City of New Bern, NC Government

Braedon Oliver, used with permission

Note: New Bern Post has reached out to Officer Rhodes, Chief Summers, City Manager Mark Stephens, and Mayor Dana Outlaw for their comments about the post by Officer Rhodes.

Posted in Aldermen, Board of Aldermen, Civil Rights, Community, Mayor, New Bern, Police Department, Public safety

June 2nd, 2020 by newbernpostadmin

With every new headline about a mass shooting, terrorist attack, hate crime or natural disaster, many of us fear for our safety and that of our loved ones. In 2020, though, by far the biggest safety concern on Americans’ minds is the coronavirus pandemic, which has killed around 100,000 Americans and infected nearly 1.7 million as of late-May. To put that in perspective, last year 38,000 people died in car crashes and there were around 15,200 gun-related deaths (non-suicide). Though tragedy can strike in any state, especially during this pandemic, some states are more vulnerable to danger than others.

June is National Safety Month. With the U.S. devastated by the coronavirus pandemic this year, the personal-finance website WalletHub released its report on 2020’s Safest States in America.

In order to determine the most secure states, WalletHub compared the 50 states across 53 key metrics. The data set ranges from the state’s coronavirus support to assaults per capita and the unemployment rate.

Safest States in America Least Safe States in America
1. Maine 41. South Carolina
2. Vermont 42. Georgia
3. Minnesota 43. Alabama
4. Utah 44. Missouri
5. Wyoming 45. Oklahoma
6. Iowa 46. Texas
7. Massachusetts 47. Arkansas
8. New Hampshire 48. Florida
9. Connecticut 49. Louisiana
10. Rhode Island 50. Mississippi

 

Where’s North Carolina in all this? North Carolina, the 10th largest state by population, ranks squarely in the middle at 26th for safety in this study.

Key Stats

  • South Dakota has the fewest murders and non-negligent manslaughters per 100,000 residents, 1.36, which is 8.4 times fewer than in Louisiana, the most at 11.37.
  • New Hampshire has the fewest thefts per 1,000 residents, 12.75, which is 2.8 times fewer than in New Mexico, the most at 35.55.
  • New Jersey has the most law-enforcement employees per 100,000 residents, 473, which is 2.2 times more than in Washington, the fewest at 211.
  • Delaware has the lowest share of high school students who were bullied online, 10.10 percent, which is 2.1 times lower than in Louisiana, the highest at 21.20 percent.

In order to determine the safest states in America, WalletHub compared the 50 states across 53 key safety indicators grouped into five different categories. Our data set ranges from the state’s coronavirus support to assaults per capita and the unemployment rate. Read on for our findings, expert insight from a panel of researchers and a full description of our methodology.

Source: WalletHub

 

Safest States in the U.S.

Overall Rank (1 = Safest) State Total Score ‘Personal & Residential Safety’ Rank ‘Financial Safety’ Rank ‘Road Safety’ Rank ‘Workplace Safety’ Rank ‘Emergency Preparedness’ Rank
1 Maine 66.02 1 20 1 22 1
2 Vermont 65.48 2 7 10 14 9
3 Minnesota 62.42 11 4 3 1 21
4 Utah 61.71 21 13 7 4 6
5 Wyoming 59.21 6 15 16 20 22
6 Iowa 59.21 3 3 4 10 44
7 Massachusetts 58.84 10 1 2 30 10
8 New Hampshire 58.82 7 10 22 43 4
9 Connecticut 58.81 4 17 23 24 16
10 Rhode Island 58.15 8 26 6 39 11
11 Washington 57.53 34 9 20 12 8
12 Oregon 56.99 26 21 18 9 13
13 Hawaii 55.89 22 8 43 21 5
14 New Jersey 53.71 9 23 28 23 24
15 Virginia 53.29 29 14 21 2 31
16 Maryland 52.32 30 22 19 15 23
17 Indiana 52.20 19 33 24 11 29
18 North Dakota 51.83 5 2 5 50 37
19 Wisconsin 51.71 20 19 15 34 18
20 Idaho 51.20 24 16 11 47 17
21 Delaware 50.83 13 37 17 40 14
22 Michigan 50.83 45 28 26 13 15
23 New York 50.40 12 24 8 32 28
24 Kentucky 50.37 15 43 35 16 30
25 Arizona 50.33 42 32 48 7 7
26 North Carolina 49.88 16 25 39 6 43
27 Nevada 49.78 48 40 45 3 3
28 New Mexico 49.64 38 45 49 5 12
29 Alaska 48.52 50 30 37 18 2
30 Nebraska 47.60 14 6 13 38 40
31 California 47.37 46 27 42 17 19
32 West Virginia 46.88 18 34 31 45 20
33 Pennsylvania 46.45 23 31 29 31 27
34 Illinois 45.92 33 41 9 25 34
35 Ohio 45.29 36 46 14 26 26
36 Colorado 44.45 39 5 40 42 25
37 Kansas 44.41 28 18 12 27 47
38 Montana 44.07 31 12 27 41 33
39 Tennessee 43.70 47 38 33 8 36
40 South Dakota 43.33 27 11 25 49 39
41 South Carolina 41.46 44 39 46 19 38
42 Georgia 40.91 25 50 44 28 35
43 Alabama 40.22 32 35 36 33 46
44 Missouri 40.12 37 29 38 29 41
45 Oklahoma 37.45 35 47 32 46 45
46 Texas 36.61 40 36 30 37 48
47 Arkansas 36.14 49 42 41 35 32
48 Florida 34.63 41 44 47 44 42
49 Louisiana 32.53 43 49 34 36 49
50 Mississippi 32.00 17 48 50 48 50

 

 

 

Posted in Public safety, WalletHub

May 30th, 2020 by newbernpostadmin

A demonstrator carries a sign along Dr. Martin Luther King Junior Boulevard in new Bern on Saturday afternoon. The image on his sweatshirt depicts a lynching. Photo by Mark Foster

Protesters took positions along Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard in New Bern on Saturday afternoon, taking a stand against police brutality, oppression, and deadly force against African Americans that reached a fever pitch with the suffocation slaying of George Floyd in Minneapolis earlier this week.

The protest was peaceful, with participants with signs standing beside the street.

Protests elsewhere, particularly larger cities including Minneapolis, New York, and Washington D.C., have turned violent and deadly. Demonstrators overtook police precinct stations in Minneapolis and New York, and tussled with Washington police and Secret Service at barricades outside the White House.

In Minnesota, the governor there mobilized the National Guard today to keep the peace.

Craven County law enforcement leaders issued statements on Friday condemning the slaying of Floyd in unusually strong terms. You can see them here, here, and here.

A protest march is happening, meeting at the old Days Hotel at 7 p.m., and leaving at 7:30 with a march to City Hall.

This is a developing story.

Posted in Civil Rights, Craven County, DA, New Bern, Police Department, Public safety, Sheriff

May 29th, 2020 by newbernpostadmin

New Bern Chief of Police Toussaint E.Summers, Jr. offered his condolences in the slaying of a Minnesota man at the hands of police there.

Chief Summers posted a letter on his department’s Facebook wall on Friday. It said:

“From the Office of the Chief of Police
May 29, 2020

“Today, our sincerest sympathies and condolences are extended to George Floyd’s family and friends.

“New Bern Chief of Police Toussaint E. Summers, Jr. joins police chiefs across the state and across the country in denouncing the actions of police officers during his arrest, which ultimately led to his death. The actions of these officers appear without merit and justification. This unacceptable police behavior ruptures the fabric of public trust in law enforcement. It goes against our professional code of conduct and defies our commitment to protect and serve all people.

“The New Bern Police Department works tirelessly to foster positive relationships and partnerships with everyone in our community. As law enforcement officials, we must always adhere to the high standards of fair treatment, dignity, and respect toward all individuals each and every day.

“Those standards were abandoned in this arrest and we strongly condemn this behavior.

“George Floyd’s family, friends, his community, and the Minneapolis Police Department remain in our thoughts and prayers.”

Chief Summers signed the letter.

Posted in New Bern, Police Department, Public safety

May 23rd, 2020 by newbernpostadmin

Craven County Health reported 13 new cases in the past 24 hours, bringing the count to 181 confirmed COVID-19 cases as of 11:00 a.m. on May 23, 2020.

All 13 cases could be traced to a previously confirmed case. The health department report did not say if the 13 new cases are related to the county’s main outbreak cluster, which totaled 123 cases Friday afternoon. If related, that would bring the cluster to 136 cases out of 181 in the county.

Meanwhile, there are now 132 active cases in Craven County, a number that has continued to grow steadily since May 5, with 45 recoveries, a number that has remained the same for much of the week.

The number of deaths remained the same at four, while the number of cases hospitalized droped by one, and was three as of Saturday afternoon, according to the Health Department report.

An individual is considered recovered if they are doing well and are out of isolation. The recovered cases completed the necessary isolation requirement and have been free of COVID-19 symptoms for at least 72 hours.

Of the 181 cases, seven have been related to out of state travel, 26 are from community transmission, and 148 are a direct contact with a previously confirmed positive case.  T

 

Total Confirmed Cases Craven County

Active Cases

Craven County

Recovered 

Craven County

Deaths

Craven County

Currently Hospitalized 

Craven County

181

132

45

4

3

 

The Craven County Health Department works with state, commercial, and private labs to track the number of confirmed positive COVID-19 cases in Craven County. Health care providers determine which lab they send their COVID-19 tests to. There are multiple hospital and commercial labs that conduct COVID-19 tests. These labs manage their own supplies and operate independently from the Department of Health and Human Services and the North Carolina State Laboratory of Public Health.

Craven County will continue to track and post the number of laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 cases; however, it is important to recognize there are many people with COVID-19 who will not be included in daily counts of laboratory-confirmed cases, including:

  • People who had minimal or no symptoms and were not tested.
  • People who had symptoms but did not seek medical care.
  • People who sought medical care but were not tested.
  • People with COVID-19 in whom the virus was not detected by testing.

The number of laboratory-confirmed cases will increasingly provide a limited picture of the spread of infections in Craven County as COVID-19 becomes more widespread and the number of infected people who are not included in the daily counts of laboratory-confirmed cases increases.

Region

As has often been case over the pst two weeks, the largest growth occurred in Craven County over the past 24 cases, with 13 new cases. Overall, the eight-county region in and around Craven County saw 40 new cases but zero deaths.

State

Updated daily by 11 a.m. Last updated May 23, 2020 at 11:33 a.m.

Knowing when to dial up or down measures that slow the spread of the virus depends on North Carolina’s testing, tracing and trends. This dashboard provides an overview on the metrics and capacities that the state is following.

Overview

Cases

Deaths

Testing

Contact Tracing

Does North Carolina have sufficient capacity to conduct contact tracing?

Updated every Wednesday by 4 p.m.

Contact tracing is a proven, effective way to help slow the spread of COVID-19. Contact tracing identifies people that have recently been in close contact with someone who has tested positive for COVID-19. This helps us more rapidly identify those who may have been exposed to COVID-19 and quickly get them the necessary supports and resources that can help protect them and their loved ones.

Local health departments and health agencies have used contact tracing in North Carolina for decades to control the spread of other diseases such as tuberculosis and measles. Local health departments have been using contact tracing for COVID-19 since the first cases were identified in North Carolina.

To meet the scale needed to respond to COVID-19, we are building on the work of local health departments to expand contact tracing by tapping into additional local health department employees, contractors (through the Carolina Community Tracing Collaborative and Child Care Health Consultants), hospitals, and other community partners.

North Carolina is committed to ensuring contact tracing teams reflect the communities they serve and are well positioned to reach the communities hardest hit by COVID.

Contact Tracing by the Numbers Status
New Contact Tracers hired through Carolina Community Tracing Collaborative 152
Number of Contact Tracers 250

Who has been hired through the Carolina Community Tracing Collaborative?

Demographics of Contact Tracers Hired Total Hired Hired Percentage
Black or African American 44 29%
Hispanic or Latino 19 13%
American Indian or Alaska Native 4 3%
Asian 4 3%
White 60 39%
Two or more races 6 4%
No Response 15 10%
Sum 152 100%

 

Language(s) Spoken by Contact Tracers Total Percent
English Only 82 55%
Bilingual 69 45%

Posted in Craven County, Health, Public safety, State news

May 13th, 2020 by newbernpostadmin

Message from Sheriff:

Our pastors and church leaders have been patient and have adhered to government authority thus far regarding the Governor’s restrictions on holding indoor worship services.

Church families are law abiding citizens, salt of the earth people that should be able to stand in unison to protect our First Amendment rights to “assemble peaceably” and exercise our freedom of worship.

Retail businesses are allowed to operate daily under rules; however, church goers have been unable to go to church once a week which is inconsistent, unfair, and quite frankly, morally wrong. All we’re asking the Governor to do is allow indoor worship services with reasonable restrictions, somewhat similar to local retail businesses.

I believe that if social distancing and other guidelines are good enough to allow big box stores to operate, it should be good enough for in person church services. It’s as though churches have been treated differently. For example, currently worship services are limited in-doors to 10 people, but 50 people can utilize the same space for a funeral.

I think our pastors and church leaders would be more inclined to implement safety guidelines for their brothers and sisters than businesses do for their customers. Why can’t churches be trusted to open their doors and take precautions to protect their people’s health and well-being?

As Sheriff of Craven County, the deputies and I took an oath that we would endeavor to support, maintain, and defend the Constitution for the people of this country. As long as I am Sheriff, neither my deputies nor I will forego that oath and interfere or prevent church goers to peaceably assemble and exercise their constitutional right to freely worship.

Craven County Sheriff

Chip Hughes

Posted in Craven County, Health, New Bern, Public safety

May 4th, 2020 by newbernpostadmin

On May 4, 2020, Governor Cooper extended expiration dates for N.C. Division of Motor Vehicles credentials (such as driver licenses and vehicle registrations; full list below):

  • People whose credentials expired between March 1, 2020 and Aug. 1, 2020 have been given a one-time, five-month extension (from the original expiration date) to renew driver licenses and handle vehicle registrations.
  • Any fines and fees related to expired credentials are being temporarily waived. Customers who already paid a $15 fee for a late renewal in March or April will be reimbursed.
  • This language does not change the original expiration date of the driver license or vehicle registration renewal; it only provides a one-time extension. 

For example: If your registration has a current deadline of March 31, 2020, then the new due date will be Aug. 31, 2020. Next year, the registration deadline will revert to March 31, 2021.

  • Road skills tests are still a requirement for those seeking a limited provisional license, or a first-time driver license. Road tests are not being offered until it is determined it is safe to do so.
  • The five-month extension applies to any credential that expires on or after March 1, and before Aug. 31. The list includes:
  • Driver license
  • Learner’s permit
  • Limited learner’s permit
  • Limited provisional license
  • Full provisional license
  • Commercial driver license
  • Commercial learner’s permit
  • Temporary driving certificate
  • Special identification card
  • Handicapped placard
  • Vehicle registration
  • Temporary vehicle registration
  • Dealer license plate
  • Transporter plate
  • Loaner/Dealer “LD” plate
  • Vehicle inspection authorization
  • Inspection station license
  • Inspection mechanic license
  • Transportation network company permit
  • Motor vehicle dealer license
  • Sales representative license
  • Manufacturer licenseDistributor license
  • Wholesaler license
  • Driver training school license
  • Driver training school instructor licenseProfessional house-moving license

DMV Credential Extensions Frequently Asked Questions

  • I have a license or registration that expires between March 1, 2020 and August 1, 2020, what do I do?If your license expires between March 1, 2020 and August 1, 2020 and you do not wish to go into a DMV office you have several options:
    • Check to see if your transaction can be completed online.
    • If it cannot be completed online, or you do not wish to conduct business online, you are eligible for a one-time, five-month extension on your license or registration. Please note that this is a one-time, temporary extension. For example: If your registration has a current deadline of March 31, 2020, then the new due date will be Aug. 31, 2020. In 2021, the registration deadline will revert to March 31, 2021.
  • What if I have already had my car inspected but do not want to go into an office?
  • If you already have had your car inspected, you can likely complete your registration online. If you do not wish to do this online, your vehicle inspection is valid for 90 days. If you do not renew your vehicle registration before the 90 days are up, you will need to have your car inspected again.


  • My child received a Driving Eligibility Certificate from their school, but we haven’t been able to get to a DMV office for them to test for a driving permit, what can we do?
  • If your child has a valid Driving Eligibility Certificate issued by their school that was dated between Feb. 9, 2020 and March 10, 2020, that certificate will be accepted by the Division of Motor Vehicles for up to 30 days after all DMV offices have been reopened.

  • I am a CDL license holder and am required to submit periodic medical certification paperwork to the NCDMV. Am I still required to submit those documents?
  • Yes. Please contact the NCDMV Medical Review Unit. On a case by case basis, your Medical Waiver may be extended by up to five months.

  • I am a CDL license holder with a specialized endorsement (Ex: Hazmat). My endorsement expires soon, what can I do?
  • If your endorsement expires between March 1, 2020 and Aug. 1, 2020, you are eligible for a five-month extension.

  • I have seen that other states are waiving the road test for individuals who want to get their driver license. Is the NCDMV doing this too?
  • No. It is still a requirement that individuals seeking a limited provisional license, or a first-time driver license, pass a road skills test. Road tests are not being offered until it is determined it is safe to do so.
  • What “credentials” or services fall under the five-month extension?
    • Driver license
    • Learner’s permit
    • Limited learner’s permit
    • Limited provisional license
    • Full provisional license
    • Commercial driver license
    • Commercial learner’s permit
    • Temporary driving certificate
    • Special identification card
    • Handicapped placard
    • Vehicle registration
    • Temporary vehicle registration
    • Dealer license plate
    • Transporter plate
    • Loaner/Dealer “LD” plate
    • Vehicle inspection authorization
    • Inspection station license
    • Inspection mechanic license
    • Transportation network company permit
    • Motor vehicle dealer license
    • Sales representative license
    • Manufacturer license
    • Distributor license
    • Wholesaler license
    • Driver training school license
    • Driver training school instructor license
    • Professional house-moving license

Posted in Health, Public safety, State news

March 17th, 2020 by newbernpostadmin

WalletHub, the personal finance website that releases a wide range of rankings, has released a new comparison, this one ranking the states that are most and least aggressively fighting COVID-19.

North Carolina ranked 30th.

According to the World Health Organization, the primary way that coronavirus (COVID-19) spreads is through close interaction with other people, Wallet Hub reported. If people come into contact with droplets exhaled or coughed out by infected people, they are at risk of getting the virus. In response, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has recommended that Americans use “social distancing.” This includes canceling large events and staying at least two meters away from others when possible, among other measures to limit close contact.

Wallet Hub said any states have taken the CDC’s advice and have legally enforced social distancing, to the point of banning large gatherings and mandating that restaurants and bars close in some cases. Other states have focused on laws ensuring greater funding for combating the pandemic or guaranteeing that treatment is covered by insurance. Some states have even taken hygiene into their own hands – for example, New York is manufacturing its own hand sanitizer to deal with shortages.

In order to determine the states that are most and least aggressive in their efforts to limit exposure to coronavirus, WalletHub compared the 50 states and the District of Columbia across 35 unique metrics. Our data set ranges from tested cases of COVID-19 per capita and state legislation on the pandemic to the uninsured population and share of the workforce in affected industries. Read on for the ranking and a complete description of our methodology

Source: WalletHub

 

State with the Most Aggressive Measures in Limiting Virus Exposure

Overall Rank State Score Interval ‘Prevention & Containment’ Rank ‘Risk Factors & Infrastructure’ Rank ‘Economic Impact’ Rank
1 Rhode Island >=60 1 22 43
2 Connecticut >=60 2 8 18
3 Maryland >=60 3 18 2
4 New York >=60 4 40 5
5 Washington >=60 5 9 14
6 Massachusetts >=60 9 10 3
7 New Jersey >=60 6 28 24
8 Minnesota 55 – 60 17 1 4
9 Vermont 55 – 60 7 7 44
10 District of Columbia 55 – 60 8 33 26
11 New Hampshire 50 – 55 12 5 25
12 Ohio 50 – 55 11 34 23
13 Wisconsin 50 – 55 13 12 27
14 New Mexico 50 – 55 10 46 38
15 Utah 50 – 55 24 4 15
16 South Dakota 45 – 50 20 20 30
17 Illinois 45 – 50 19 17 39
18 Delaware 45 – 50 28 11 12
19 Alaska 45 – 50 14 15 49
20 North Dakota 45 – 50 27 3 31
21 Pennsylvania 45 – 50 22 25 33
22 Louisiana 45 – 50 16 44 36
23 California 45 – 50 18 32 40
24 Virginia 45 – 50 30 13 11
25 Arkansas 45 – 50 23 49 13
26 Montana 45 – 50 15 23 50
27 Michigan 45 – 50 31 29 10
28 Oregon 45 – 50 21 27 46
29 Arizona 40 – 45 32 43 6
30 North Carolina 40 – 45 29 39 16
31 Alabama 40 – 45 35 50 1
31 West Virginia 40 – 45 25 48 20
33 Maine 40 – 45 26 26 42
34 Iowa 40 – 45 38 6 9
35 Colorado 40 – 45 37 2 41
36 Nebraska 40 – 45 43 14 8
37 Florida 35 – 40 33 41 45
38 Idaho 35 – 40 40 16 37
39 Georgia 35 – 40 46 30 7
40 Kentucky 35 – 40 39 45 32
41 South Carolina 35 – 40 42 36 22
42 Indiana 35 – 40 45 24 21
43 Tennessee 35 – 40 41 42 35
44 Kansas 35 – 40 50 19 17
45 Hawaii 35 – 40 36 35 47
46 Missouri 35 – 40 47 38 29
47 Oklahoma 35 – 40 44 47 34
48 Nevada 30 – 35 34 37 51
49 Texas 30 – 35 51 31 19
50 Mississippi 30 – 35 48 51 28
51 Wyoming 30 – 35 49 21 48

Note: Rankings are based on data available as of 5 p.m. EST on Monday March 16.

 

Posted in Health, Public safety

October 28th, 2019 by newbernpostadmin

New Bern, North Carolina, ranked above its small city peers in Eastern North Carolina, but not so well compared to other small cities in North Carolina or nationally in a new WalletHub report released today.

The study takes into account affordability, economic health, education and health, quality of life, and safety.

Using those measures, New Bern ranks ahead of every other small city straddling or east of Interstate 95, including its closest neighbors considered “small cities,” Greenville and Jacksonville. Smaller towns including Havelock and Kinston were not included in the study.

As for the rest of the state, New Bern falls in the middle of the pack, and in the nation, posted an unremarkable 29th percentile.

Source: WalletHub
Here is a chart of North Carolina small cities (apologies that the grid does not line up):

Percentile*

City

Total Score

‘Affordability’ Rank

‘Economic Health’ Rank

‘Education & Health’ Rank

‘Quality of Life’ Rank

‘Safety’ Rank

98

Holly Springs, NC

68.7

15

203

242

1052

72

98

Apex, NC

68.61

86

34

244

618

187

95

Wake Forest, NC

67.15

103

80

270

483

291

89

Huntersville, NC

65.48

76

129

531

637

299

85

Asheville, NC

64.42

983

215

619

4

1165

84

Matthews, NC

64.33

138

171

551

329

623

83

Chapel Hill, NC

64.19

869

266

581

63

473

80

Concord, NC

63.66

332

227

806

244

385

71

Mooresville, NC

62.18

380

192

707

137

877

54

Cornelius, NC

59.32

303

204

535

513

665

52

Kannapolis, NC

59.02

504

94

1026

899

662

50

Garner, NC

58.61

382

1093

353

629

820

36

Indian Trail, NC

56.56

96

379

509

1224

1072

33

Hickory, NC

55.97

666

633

1094

98

1123

29

New Bern, NC

55.15

923

870

1031

178

1009

21

Thomasville, NC

53.63

585

774

1093

1019

1075

18

Burlington, NC

53.11

793

888

1058

409

1082

16

Jacksonville, NC

52.6

1128

1057

839

251

944

15

Monroe, NC

52.31

821

854

808

578

1191

12

Greenville, NC

51.71

1075

1146

969

145

1087

11

Asheboro, NC

51.3

806

756

1134

544

1148

8

Sanford, NC

50.08

679

891

1118

515

1224

5

Salisbury, NC

48.66

959

879

1148

363

1234

5

Rocky Mount, NC

48.58

852

1129

1200

640

1158

4

Gastonia, NC

48.39

826

707

1161

635

1237

4

Wilson, NC

48.12

828

1102

1167

592

1208

2

Goldsboro, NC

46.5

1037

1177

1154

316

1236

 

Go here for the rest of the story.

Posted in Economy, Economy and Employment, Health, Public safety

July 22nd, 2019 by newbernpostadmin

The following New Bern-area residents were recently charged with animal cruelty by the Craven County Sheriff’s Office Animal Protective Services Division.

Melba Turner Jones, 49, of 510 Old Vanceboro Road, New Bern, is charged with felony kill animal by starvation.

Jones had three cats that she failed to provide appropriate food and water for causing their deaths.

Justin Broome, 27, of 402 Hart Drive, New Bern, is charged with cruelty to animals and abandonment of animals.

Broome left four pit bull terriers on his property with no access to food, water, or shelter.

Jebadia Jon Batchlor, 25, of 611 Johnson Street, New Bern, is charged with cruelty to animals.

Batchlor failed to provide appropriate food and water for a German Shepherd, pit bull, Pomeranian, and terrier, causing the animals to be underweight.

Sheriff Chip Hughes said, “There will be zero tolerance for animal cruelty in Craven County. We are aggressively going after folks like these individuals that think it’s OK to mistreat, abuse, and not care for their animals.”

Posted in Craven County, Crime, New Bern, Public safety

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