New Bern, North Carolina, ranked above its small city peers in Eastern North Carolina, but not so well compared to other small cities in North Carolina or nationally in a new WalletHub report released today. The study takes into account affordability, economic health, education and health, quality of life, and safety. Using those measures, New Bern ranks ahead of every other small city straddling or east of Interstate 95, including its closest neighbors considered “small cities,” Greenville and Jacksonville. Smaller towns including Havelock and Kinston were not included in the study. As for the rest of the state, New Bern falls in the middle ofRead More →

Source: WalletHub North Carolina ranks second to last for access to medical care, according to a study by WalletHub. According to the CDC, 87.6 percent of the nation’s population has a regular place to go for medical care. But the cost and service quality of that care can vary widely from state to state. The overall health of the population, more advanced medical equipment and a general lack of awareness regarding the best types of treatment, for instance, can all affect costs. Today, the average American spends more than $10,000 per year on personal health care, according to the most recent estimates from the Centers forRead More →

Analysis provides a county-by-county update to 2014 data as North Carolina considers Medicaid expansion Expanding Medicaid would create more than 37,000 new jobs and insure approximately 365,000 more people, according to a new non-partisan analysis. The report was prepared by researchers at The George Washington University with funding from Cone Health Foundation and the Kate B. Reynolds Charitable Trust. Craven County alone would experience 169 new jobs and 5,720 more people covered by Medicaid by 2022. The county’s economy would grow by $35.5 million, and county tax revenues would increase by $390,000. In addition to the new jobs created and the hundreds of thousands of uninsured residentsRead More →

A free annual event, Carnival of Colors, will be Saturday, March 30, from noon to 2 p.m. at the North Carolina History Center, 529 S. Front Street, New Bern. The event celebrates cancer patients, survivors and legacies. The event includes New Bern Get Your Color On Board members, Cancer Resource Groups including CarolinaEast Hospital and CCHC, Local Business Sponsors, Music provided by Strung Together, Live Painting by local Artist Sarah Brumbaugh, event guests and more. New Bern Get Your Color On (NBGYCO) is a community organization that strives to promote awareness and education as well as support hose affected by all types of cancer. ProceedsRead More →

Craven Community College’s (Craven CC) Adult Enrichment Program (AEP) will host a symposium entitled “Stop the Cravin’!” in an effort to promote substance abuse education, prevention and intervention. This free event will take place at Orringer Hall on the New Bern Campus from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Thursday, March 14. The event will feature a diverse panel of speakers from local health care providers, local and state law enforcement and community-based organizations. It will provide statistics for the area, health effects and the science behind the many aspects of addiction, case studies and firsthand accounts from those in the medical field. There will alsoRead More →

Sarah, a New Bern resident, has lost 100 pounds. She can help you reach your weight goal, too. Whether you’re carrying a few extra pounds after the holidays, or if your New Year’s resolution is to shed some unwanted weight, we can help. Just ask New Bern resident Sarah — she’s lost 100 pounds using this plan. Send us an email to learn how Sarah did it. She’s happy to share her recipes and diet plan. Or go here if you want to start right away. It’s a great way to kick off the new year. Money back guarantee.Read More →

Valley Fine Foods, a Forest City, N.C. establishment, is recalling approximately 35,516 pounds of heat-treated, not fully cooked meat and poultry products that may be adulterated due to presence of spoilage organisms that have rendered it unwholesome and unfit for human food, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today. The heat-treated, not fully cooked, refrigerated meat and poultry products were produced on various dates from Aug. 15, 2018 through Oct. 4, 2018. The following products are subject to recall: • 12-oz. tray packages containing “SIMPLE DISHES™ Chicken Penne Alfredo” with case code #19034, case UPC code 1-07-42753-34709-0, and “BESTRead More →

NORTH CAROLINA HEALTH NEWS |  That’s the takeaway from a state-compiled list of the adults who died as a result of the catastrophic storm. It shows that two out of three North Carolinians who died during or as a result of Florence were 60 or older, and nearly half were 70 or older. The median age of adults who died during or as a result of the storm was 67, while the statewide median age is 38.3. “Vulnerable adults are more likely to be impacted because of their social isolation, or not having the supports they needed in areas like transportation,” said Heather Burkhardt, program coordinatorRead More →

LONGLEAF POLITICS | Hurricane Matthew struck eastern North Carolina on Oct. 9, 2016. A full 18 months later, some of the first federally funded repairs are slated to begin this June. Hurricane Matthew has re-emerged as a political issue in Raleigh as thousands of people in eastern North Carolina await public money to rebuild. The storm was one of the most devastating in North Carolina’s history, killing 31 people and caused more than $4.8 billion in damage. Matthew set rainfall records in 17 counties, and 2,300 people were rescued from floodwaters. Why is recovery taking so long? It mostly has to do with the processes set upRead More →

Though Florence has come and gone, people affected by the hurricane are still cleaning up and rebuilding. Those in affected areas with asthma and allergies must be extra careful during this time. There are many things to consider as they remove debris, clean up flood damage and make repairs. Long after waters have receded, flood waters can leave behind chemicals, bacteria, viruses and mold. These can create long-term health issues if you have asthma and allergies. Mold is one of the biggest concerns after a flood. Mold, a fungus, can grow in any damp environment. It is different from plants or animals in how itRead More →